About WTVM - WTVM.com-Columbus, GA News Weather & Sports

About WTVM

Profile

Station: WTVM
Affiliation: ABC
Location: Columbus, GA
Market: 126
Website: http://www.wtvm.com

People

General Manager: Holly Steuart  

Marketing Director: Brian Correll

News Director: Shawn Reynolds

Assistant News Director: Deloris Washington

Digital Content Director: Jasmine Agyemang

Overview

WTVM-TV became the first television station on the air in Columbus, Georgia on October 6, 1953. Allen Woodall, Sr. owned WDAK Radio in Columbus. He went into partnership with Martin Theatres to start WDAK-TV on Channel 28.

Martin Theatres became the sole owners in 1956 and changed the station call letters to WTVM-TV, which stands for TeleVision Martin. They also changed the channel allocation to VHF Channel 9 to serve a larger portion of the West Georgia and East Alabama community.

WTVM-TV was located on 1st Avenue in Columbus where the current Carmike building is located. J.B. Fuqua bought the station and moved it to Wynnton Road in 1970.

WTVM-TV has had five owners since Fuqua. Western Broadcasting bought the station in 1980. SFN Publishing became the owner in 1984. A group of SFN managers formed Pegasus Broadcasting and purchased WTVM-TV in 1986. Aflac bought the station in 1989.

Aflac sold WTVM to Raycom Media, Inc. of Montgomery, Alabama, on April 15, 1997.

WTVM continues to be the News Leader in the Columbus television market.  With a staff of 40+ news professionals, we broadcast more than 4 hours of news each day on WTVM and well as providing news for WXTX, the area's FOX affiliate.

  • 5 am - 7 am
  • 12 pm - 12:30 pm
  • 5 pm - 5:30 pm
  • 5:30 pm - 6 pm
  • 6 pm - 6:30 pm
  • 7 pm - 7:30 pm (on WXTX)
  • 10 pm - 11 pm (on WXTX)
  • 11 pm - 11:35 pm
  • Trending StoriesTrending StoriesMore>>

  • Deadly virus threatens local crawfish industry

    Deadly virus threatens local crawfish industry

    Tuesday, May 23 2017 7:26 PM EDT2017-05-23 23:26:19 GMT

    A deadly virus is threatening the crawfish industry in Southwest Louisiana. It's called white spot syndrome virus and it was first discovered in Thailand, but somehow it made its way to ponds in South Louisiana and specialists are struggling to find the funds to research a solution.  “The catch was increasing and increasing and then it dropped 70% and that's when you saw the dead crawfish floating in the water,” said a crawfish farmer of 34 years, Ian Garbarino. He...

    More >>

    A deadly virus is threatening the crawfish industry in Southwest Louisiana. It's called white spot syndrome virus and it was first discovered in Thailand, but somehow it made its way to ponds in South Louisiana and specialists are struggling to find the funds to research a solution.  “The catch was increasing and increasing and then it dropped 70% and that's when you saw the dead crawfish floating in the water,” said a crawfish farmer of 34 years, Ian Garbarino. He...

    More >>
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