Health Source - WTVM.com-Columbus, GA News Weather & Sports

(Source: WTVM) (Source: WTVM)

Preventing spinal cord injuries in athletes Video included

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Spinal cord injuries are not considered common on the football field, but they can be dramatic.  In some cases, those injuries can lead to paralysis.  

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Today's Top Stories on News Leader 9

Columbus doctor addresses concussions in sports Video included

(Source: WTVM) (Source: WTVM)
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A lot has changed recently in the world of sports to help prevent concussions among athletes. New rules are now in place for football and soccer players at the high school, collegiate and professional levels.  

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How to protect yourself from the flu virus Video included

(Source: WTVM) (Source: WTVM)
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Georgia has seen its first flu-related death this year, and 108 people have been hospitalized so far this season in our area due to the flu. The health department says the individual who died from the flu was elderly, but it can strike anyone at any time. 

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NEWS 9 MD: Vanishing varicose veins and no knife needed Video included

NEWS 9 MD: Vanishing varicose veins and no knife needed. (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire/WTVM) NEWS 9 MD: Vanishing varicose veins and no knife needed. (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire/WTVM)
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They’re unsightly and in severe cases, could signal a potential health problem. Millions of Americans are prone to the condition.  Here’s how a No Knife procedure repairs varicose veins, without scarring. 

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Columbus Health Dept. encourages residents to get flu shots Video included

(Source: WTVM) (Source: WTVM)
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With flu activity increasing and family and friends planning gatherings for the holidays, the Columbus Health Department says now is a great time to get a flu vaccine.  

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News 9 MD: New Ideal breast implants Video included

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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Approximately four percent of American women get breast implants. That’s one in 26. Last year the FDA approved a new type of implant which some providers say is the best of two worlds, the safety of saline and the feel of silicone.

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News 9 MD: Fruit flies hold the secret to sleep? Video included

(Source: WTVM) (Source: WTVM)
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We all know how much better we feel after a good night’s sleep, but sleep is also key for staying healthy. 

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Detecting eye damage early

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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Diabetes can cause a number of serious side effects including eye conditions like cataracts and diabetic retinopathy, a condition that causes progressive damage to the eyes. Researchers are finding ways to see the very early signs of diabetic eye damage, so they can treat it before the damage is done. 

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News 9 MD: Battling brain cancer with lasers Video included

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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Glioblastoma is the most common form of brain cancer and also the most deadly. Surgery, radiation and chemotherapy can buy patients precious time, but in most cases, it’s no cure. Now, researchers have found a high-tech laser surgery that may have an added benefit for patients. 

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News 9 MD: Depression Screening Video included

(Source: WTVM) (Source: WTVM)
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A federal task force recommends that everybody gets screened for depression.  Here’s more on how a pioneering study is making a difference.  

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Custom stents help people breathe

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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When breathing is hard, life is hard. Every single move becomes difficult. Patients with serious breathing disorders sometimes need stents to keep their airways open. Until now, these devices were made with a one-size-fits-all approach. But custom stents are helping some people breathe easier. 

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Lungs in a box save a woman

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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On any given day, more than 1,600 people in North America are on a waiting list for new lungs. Many of those patients will not get the transplant they desperately need and will die waiting. Doctors say one challenge is that many potential donor lungs are too damaged for transplantation. But now, new technology is reconditioning lungs and saving lives. 

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New hope for brain cancer

Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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More than 12,000 people in the U.S. will be diagnosed with a glioblastoma in 2016. These are the deadliest of all brain tumors. If the tumor comes back after chemo and radiation, patients have very few options and are typically given just a few months to live. Now there’s new hope on the horizon. 

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NEWS 9 MD: New Treatment for PTSD Video included

(Source: WTVM) (Source: WTVM)
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PTSD affects more than seven million adults every year.  Many of those affected are military service personnel who’ve returned from combat. There is no cure for PTSD, but a new drug currently in clinical trials is looking like the best treatment so far. 

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Newest lumbar disc replacement

(Source: Nevit Dilmen) (Source: Nevit Dilmen)
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For the first time in ten years, people with chronic back pain now have a new option to get them back on their feet.  The FDA recently approved the newest generation of artificial lumbar discs and some patients who’ve gotten the implants say the results are life-changing. 

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Fruit flies hold the secret to sleep: Medicine’s next big thing? Video included

(Source: WTVM) (Source: WTVM)
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We all know how much better we feel after a good night’s sleep, but sleep is also key for staying healthy. If you don’t get enough sleep, there’s evidence that your brain activity changes. Researchers are studying the impact of sleep on insomniac fruit flies to see how they can help humans. 

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LITT for Epilepsy

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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Three million Americans have epilepsy, a disorder that causes unexpected seizures. When the condition can’t be controlled by medication, brain surgery is sometimes an option. A less invasive laser surgery is available for some patients who would otherwise have little relief. 

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Stem Cell Therapy: Supercharge the Heart

(Source: WTVM) (Source: WTVM)
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Heart researchers are excited about a new study that shows that patients’ own stem cells can be supercharged to fix damage. In the University of Utah study, there was a 37% reduction in the number of times heart failure patients went to the hospital or died. Researchers say that has never happened before.

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Boxers, MMA athletes also at risk for concussion-related injuries

Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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The NFL has taken a lot of heat for not being more proactive about the long-term issue of concussions in its athletes. Now the mixed martial arts industry, or MMA, is stepping up its game.

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Vest that allows deaf to feel speech

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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Using the sense of touch to replace the sense of hearing sounds like science fiction, but it’s very much a reality and it could be a game-changer for the profoundly deaf. 

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News 9 MD: Help for IBS Video included

(Source: WTVM) (Source: WTVM)
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The exact cause of irritable bowel syndrome or IBS is not known, although it affects nearly 45 million Americans, mostly women. New research shows the cause may not be stress or spicy foods, but an accumulation of bacteria in the small intestine. 

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Getting rid of facial fat

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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As we age, the shape of our face changes. For some, the cheeks may become thinner, and pockets of fat may develop near the neck just under the chin.  But now, a newly-approved procedure may be a huge help to some who are fighting facial fat.

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Atrantil for IBS

(Source: Henry Gray/Wikimedia Commons) (Source: Henry Gray/Wikimedia Commons)
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The exact cause of irritable bowel syndrome or IBS is not known, although it affects nearly 45 million Americans, mostly women. New research shows the cause may not be stress or spicy foods, but an accumulation of bacteria in the small intestine. 

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LUMI beads blast tumors

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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A new type of Nano bead, a medical magnetic bead, offers better treatment for some liver cancers.  It’s called the LUMI bead and it lets doctors see in real time if the bead is delivered to the target. 

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The next frontier for autism

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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The Autism Society says there are more than 3.5 million Americans on the autism spectrum right now. Often older people with autism were diagnosed later in life and did not benefit from early intervention. The Barrow Neurological Institute and the Southwest Autism Research and Resource Center, or SARRC, in Phoenix are teaming up to look at what happens in autistic people’s brains as they age. J

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Instalift ban Is lifted

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Every year, more than 15-million cosmetic procedures are done in the U.S. and people are always looking for the next best treatment. The latest is actually a new twist on an old controversial procedure that the FDA banned in 2009. But threading the face to give it an instant facelift is coming back in style. Here’s why some doctors think, this time, the non-surgical, 30-minute procedure is the perfect alternative to surgery. 

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Skate safe

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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Fifty-thousand Americans go to emergency rooms every year because of skateboard accidents. More kids and adults keep pushing their limits on their boards which equates to more crashes. Here are some ways to steer you to safety.  

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Thing to know to save a life

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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It can happen anywhere at any time-- someone collapses and stops breathing. Cardiac arrest is a leading cause of death in the United States, yet less than half of the people who have an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest get the immediate help they need.  More than 90 percent of individuals die before reaching the hospital. There are three things that most people don’t know about CPR that could save 200,000 lives a year. 

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How to avoid skin cancer

(Source: Ivanhoe Newsource) (Source: Ivanhoe Newsource)
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In 2013, there were more than one million people living with melanoma of the skin in the United States. The diagnosis drastically changed one woman’s life. Find out what she says caused her cancer, and the four things dermatologists say you need to know to prevent it.

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Never too old back surgery?

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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As we age, chronic back trouble may become a painful part of daily life. Almost 25% of all doctors’ visits for low back pain are patients over the age of 65.  At one time, surgery was considered too risky to be an option for a lot of seniors. But, minimally invasive procedures may put more older patients back in play. 

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Mind-controlled hand

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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Researchers are testing ways to restore natural hand movements to people with a devastating brain injury or amputation. They’re finding ways to restore the broken link from the brain to an artificial limb. They say for the very first time ever, they have found a way to have prosthetic fingers move independently, a monumental step for injured patients. 

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Hearing vest

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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Using the sense of touch to replace the sense of hearing sounds like science fiction, but it’s very much a reality and it could be a game-changer for the profoundly deaf. 

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Too young for a stroke?

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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If you think you’re too young to have a stroke, think again.  In the United States, 25 percent of all stroke patients are under 65, and there has been a steep increase in strokes among people in their 30s and 40s. Doctors say these younger patients may be ignoring the stroke risk factors until it’s too late. 

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Customize new knees

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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More than 700,000 Americans have knee replacement surgery every year to eliminate chronic pain from worn out joints, and doctors say that number will skyrocket over the next decade. Now, a new two-pronged approach is helping patients get back on their feet faster than ever before. 

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News 9 MD: Virtual reality testing for brain fitness

(Source: WTVM) (Source: WTVM)
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About 17 million people sustain a traumatic brain injury every year. It can be caused by a bump, blow or jolt. But the brain can also suffer when it’s not being used effectively, and now doctors are using technology that’s behind 3D movies and video games to find out what is going on inside the body’s command center. 

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Chef’s Corner: Summer Salad

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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Ellie Shropshire sharpened her culinary skills cooking on private yachts. Fourteen years ago, she took her talents to Park City, Utah and built up a booming catering business using all natural ingredients. Here's what makes her easy salad recipe a perfect summer treat. 

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Congenital Heart Disease: Today's Warriors Survive

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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About one in every 100 babies born today comes into the world with a heart defect. Just a generation ago, many of these babies would never make it to adulthood, but today, more than 85% do, and currently there are more than 1.2 million American adults who are living and thriving with congenital heart disease, leading to a whole new medical specialty. 

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Vaccine for Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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Lymphomas are the fifth most common cancer in the United States. Certain forms of the disease called low-grade Non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas are incurable. Now, researchers are testing a vaccine that helps the body’s immune system fight the cancer cells and is even putting some patients into remission. 

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New hip resurfacing procedure good option for men

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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One of the biggest demands in medicine today is hip replacements. But, a different kind of hip procedure, called Birmingham hip resurfacing, may be a good option for active men with arthritis. 

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Avoiding amputation with PET scans

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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After decades of excruciating pain and nearly 20 surgeries, one woman didn’t argue when a surgeon told her amputation was all that was left. But another surgeon said ‘wait just a minute.  It's an example of doing research, asking questions, and finding a doctor with whom you can create a great working partnership. 

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Endoscopic ear surgery

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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Hearing loss, speech or language delay, ruptured ear drums, or even meningitis can occur when ear infections become chronic. Corrective ear surgery can be painful, but a new technique allows surgeons to see more and cut less. 

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Fixing chest deformities

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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A condition that you’ve probably never heard of can wreck a child’s health and self-esteem. Pectus, or chest wall deformities, are fairly common. As many as one in 500 kids are born with pectus, which either causes the chest wall to appear sunken in or to protrude. When corrective braces don’t work, there is a surgical solution. 

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News 9 MD: Fighting C. Diff with C. Diff

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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Clostridium difficile or C. diff is one of the most common hospital-acquired infections and one of the fastest growing superbugs, making it hard to fight with traditional antibiotics.  

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Hydrogen Peroxide: What Can’t It Do

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One of the most common household disinfectants can do so much more than just clean small cuts. Here are some of the cleaning and styling tricks you can do with just one bottle of hydrogen peroxide. Even though this little brown bottle is found in the medicine aisle, its uses go far beyond that. 

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Allergy drops bring relief

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Millions of Americans suffer throughout spring and summer when allergies are in full bloom, and for many people, that means loading up on over-the-counter allergy drugs. But, new ways to make an established therapy may spell long-lasting relief. 

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NEWS 9 MD: Cancer-detecting microscope Video included

New cancer-detecting microscope. (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) New cancer-detecting microscope. (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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What if doctors could diagnose suspected cancer cells without having to take a biopsy from a patient? A new project being funded by the National Institutes of Health is making that possible. It's the first major development in surgical cancer care in more than 50 years.

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ESight for Blindness

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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What was once just a blur is now clear for the first time. It’s called eSight. It won’t work for people who are completely blind, but for those who have low vision it can provide a life- changing experience. 

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Junior’s heart saves two lives

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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Mark Girard Junior’s heart is truly the gift that keeps on giving. He was attacked and killed while sticking up for a friend in 2014. His heart was transplanted into a man who died a month later. What surgeons did then has only been done nine other times in the world. 

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News 9 MD: Mysterious disease in women

(Source: WTVM) (Source: WTVM)
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Fibromuscular dysplasia, or FMD for short, is up to ten times more common in women than in men. But it’s often overlooked because patients and their doctors have a hard time identifying the symptoms. Here’s what you need to know about this rare and mysterious disease.  

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Thoracic Outlet Syndrome

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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Imagine being injured by your own bones or muscles. That’s what happens to patients with thoracic outlet syndrome, a condition that goes misdiagnosed in many. If proper treatment is given right away, patients could be cured for good. 

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Man runs marathon weeks after heart surgery

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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If running a marathon was easy, everyone would do it. The 26.2 mile race is tough for anyone, especially for Paul Sykes. He ran one just weeks after heart surgery. Here's how he was able to do it.

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Testing baby’s DNA

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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The most recent statistics show a decline in pregnancy rates. However, despite the drop, there are more and more new tests and tips parents to be need to be aware of genetic testing can now be done earlier and is a lot more accurate. 

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News 9 MD: Diagnosing diabetes with a measuring tape?

Extra weight around the waist has been linked to an increase in heart disease, diabetes and stroke. (Source: WTVM) Extra weight around the waist has been linked to an increase in heart disease, diabetes and stroke. (Source: WTVM)
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You’ve probably heard about the dangers of belly fat in adults. Extra weight around the waist has been linked to an increase in heart disease, diabetes and stroke.  But until now, there have been few studies to determine if the same weight distribution could point to similar health problems in kids. 

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Deep breath hold protects the heart

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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Breathing deeply isn’t just for yoga class. A specialized method of deep breathing is keeping some breast cancer patients from getting unintended doses of radiation to the heart. Imagine if the side effects of radiation could be reduced, just by holding the breath. 

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Map the heart: Stop AFib

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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Atrial fibrillation, or AFib, is one of the most common heart rhythm disorders. But treatment only works about half the time. Now, that may be about to change, thanks to a new way to diagnose the condition. 

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Tapping out stress: Aging backwards

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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Mental health challenges affect 63 million Americans every year. Treatment ranges from medication to meditation to counseling. But there’s an alternative form of healing that let’s your fingers do the walking. 

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The truth about juicing

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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About 20 percent of adults who want to lose or maintain weight have tried a “cleanse.” That’s where you replace food with fruit and vegetable juices for just one day to one week or longer. It sounds healthy, but some nutritionists aren’t convinced. Ivanhoe tells you the good and the bad behind juicing.

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What's the beef with antibiotics?

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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By 2050, according to a British study, the global death toll from antibiotic-resistant infections could skyrocket to 10 million a year. Today, much of the blame is put on the meat industry. Every year, cattle ranchers use 29 million pounds of antibiotics in their animals. But how much of that really makes it to your dinner plate? 

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Firefighters and the cancer connection

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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Firefighters face many risks during their jobs, but, ironically, the most dangerous part of running into a burning building isn’t the flames, it’s the smoke. It billows off furniture, appliances and carpets in toxic waves of cancer-causing fumes. Cancer has become the number one cause of death for firefighters around the country. 

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Live liver donation on the rise

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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Last year, 359 liver transplants were made possible by live liver donation. It’s a number that has grown over the past three years, and experts say it may be evidence that more people are learning about what can be, for some, the only life-saving option.

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Same-Day Hip Surgery

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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Three-hundred thirty-two thousand Americans have hip replacement every year. For most, the surgery requires a hospital stay, and weeks of rehabilitation.  Now, a different approach to surgery is getting patients back on their feet and out of the hospital faster than ever before. 

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Talus replacement saves feet

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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A tiny bone that you’ve probably never heard of can make a huge difference in your quality of life. The talus is the part ankle that allows the foot to move in all different directions. High impact injuries like falls, or car crashes can cause the bone to fracture and die. Now, there is a new cutting-edge option for patients. 

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Saving bad hips with 3D technology

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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More than 2.5 million Americans are living with an artificial hip. For those with a failed hip replacement, many are either too afraid to have a revision or don’t know what can be done and instead live with the pain and disability. But there is hope. Now, 3D technology is helping surgeons plan and perform the surgery better than ever before. 

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Light therapy for veterans dealing with pain and sleep issues

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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Nearly half of returning veterans say they suffer from chronic pain and are four times more likely to develop sleep disorders. But instead of treating them with medications with heavy side effects, researchers are shedding some light on the matter with a different approach. 

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News 9 MD: Depression screening can make a difference Video included

(Source: WTVM) (Source: WTVM)
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Depression affects about 16 million Americans, and contributes to more than 41,000 suicides each year.  It also costs nearly $210 billion a year in treatment and lost productivity. Now, a federal task force recommends that everybody get screened for depression.  Here’s more on how a pioneering study is making a difference.  

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Cancer screening for dense breasts

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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Mammograms are the gold standard in detecting breast cancer, but they can miss tumors in women with dense breasts. The automated whole breast ultrasound, or ABUS has been finding some of those lesions in just 15 minutes. 

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I-Eat App: Treating child feeding disorders

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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Even though there is a lot of concern about children in America eating too much, there are about five-percent of children who don’t eat at all. It’s a feeding disorder that usually comes about if a child had a medical condition when they were born that caused eating to be painful. Treatment can cost tens of thousands of dollars, but one psychologist is testing out an app that may help parents treat their own kids and save money. 

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Metastatic breast cancer discovery: Medicine’s next big thing?

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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The only thing worse than finding out you have breast cancer, is learning it has spread to other parts of your body. Now researchers in Seattle have made a discovery that could help all cancer patients someday. 

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Autism awareness month: Early diagnosis for autism

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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April is national autism awareness month, and there’s good news in the fight to cope with it.  An encouraging new study shows that children are being identified younger than ever before. And, as a result, critical therapy begins very early. 

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Safe conversations for couples

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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Four out of 10 American couples still wind up getting divorced, but that percentage is starting to drop. Harville Hendrix frequently brought relationship advice to The Oprah Winfrey Show years ago, and today, he and his wife are bringing relationship education to couples around the world. 

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Zika virus warnings

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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Could a trip out of the country compromise the health of your baby? A young mom takes the pros and cons of traveling in the days of the Zika virus into consideration.  

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Concussions happen more to girls than boys in high school, doctors say

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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If you take football out of the picture, girls suffer more concussions among high school and college athletes than boys. But the head injury doesn’t discriminate. One concussion is unlikely to do permanent damage, but multiple concussions can be devastating. 

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Rooster injections: Are they something to crow about?

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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Knee and joint pain affects one hundred million Americans. Now patients can choose from many different treatment options. 

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News 9MD: The making of new teeth Video included

(Source: WTVM) (Source: WTVM)
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It’s the stuff of science fiction showing up in dental offices. Dentists and prosthodontists are using computers to make teeth, implants, and dentures. The process is called computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing, or CAD CAM. 

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Relief for pelvic pain

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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As many as one in four women in the U.S. suffer from chronic pelvic pain. 

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Breakthrough toothpaste ingredient hardens teeth while you sleep

(Source: BioMin Technologies) (Source: BioMin Technologies)
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A new toothpaste ingredient which puts back the lost minerals from tooth enamel and helps prevent  decay and treat  sensitivity while you sleep is available online and from specialist dental distributors now. It is expected to be available in stores by the end of the year. 

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CPR minus mouth-to-mouth

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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The statistic is stark: if you have a cardiac arrest and you’re not at a hospital, nine out of 10 people will die. But CPR can more than double those survival chances. And, anyone can do CPR now. 

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Five foods that taste their best in April

(Source: Ivanhoe Ivanhoe) (Source: Ivanhoe Ivanhoe)
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Spring is here and that means our favorite fruits and vegetables will be just right to eat. Although April is a little early for most produce to reach their peak, here are five foods that taste better in April than they will all year long. 

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Healing Burn Scars

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Each year, more than 500-thousand people in this country will suffer from a scalding burn. These injuries can leave lasting scars that cause physical and emotional damage. Now, a technique that expands the skin is helping patients heal.

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Saliva saving lives

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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It has taken years of research, breakthroughs and improvements to therapy, and as a result, about 80 percent of kids with cancer will survive the disease. Doctors say there is still so much to learn and so many lives to save. Now, some are turning to saliva for answers. 

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New test for brain tumors

Every year in the United States as many as 15,000 people are diagnosed with glioblastoma, the most aggressive kind of brain cancer. Every year in the United States as many as 15,000 people are diagnosed with glioblastoma, the most aggressive kind of brain cancer.
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Every year in the United States as many as 15,000 people are diagnosed with glioblastoma, the most aggressive kind of brain cancer. Many patients don’t survive more than a year after diagnosis.  A new test can help doctors pinpoint what is driving the tumor and better target their treatment early on. 

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Aging gracefully

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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Age may just be a number, but when the numbers start adding up, so do the stereotypes. One geriatrician is on a mission to dispel the negative mindset that getting older means getting worse. 

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Easy ways to save water

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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When it comes to saving water, the best way to do that is by ripping up your lawn. But it doesn’t have to be that complicated; there are some easy ways to save water which will, in turn, save money. 

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The ALIVE! Project: diet lessons from the Bible

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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What if you could lead a healthier lifestyle by incorporating the lessons learned in what many have called the ultimate guide to self-improvement? That’s what one federally funded study is aiming for, looking at how faith, knowledge and action are leading to better health. 

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Reversing Dementia: Is is NPH?

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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Normal pressure hydrocephalus or NPH is a condition that many have never heard of, but it can cause a person to lose the ability to walk and talk normally. And because the symptoms are similar to dementia or Parkinson’s, it’s a condition that can be easily overlooked. But unlike dementia, if doctors diagnose NPH, they can often reverse it. 

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Growing healthy kids starts in the kitchen

Childhood obesity has more than doubled in the past 30 years. In fact, one out of three kids are now considered obese. But one chef and mother says being healthy is a choice, even for kids.  (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) Childhood obesity has more than doubled in the past 30 years. In fact, one out of three kids are now considered obese. But one chef and mother says being healthy is a choice, even for kids.  (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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Childhood obesity has more than doubled in the past 30 years. In fact, one out of three kids are now considered obese. But one chef and mother says being healthy is a choice, even for kids.  

More>>

Plasma therapy: No new knees needed

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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Most of us don’t think about our tendons and ligaments until we tear or damage them. Surgery used to be a common fix, but a non-surgical solution using one's own blood is gaining support among professional athletes and weekend warriors. 

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How to treat a hangover: Myths and facts

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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From caffeine, to Gatorade, even raw eggs, there are some pretty wacky ways that are said to cure a hangover but which work and which don’t? We all have our personal tricks to fight off a hangover, but which ones are myths and which are true? 

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A new way to banish panic attacks

(Source: Ivanhoes Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoes Newswire)
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Sweaty palms, spinning head, racing heart and blocked lungs. That’s how someone having a panic, or anxiety attack describes the sudden, intense changes they go through.  Now, a new device is training patients to breathe better and banish panic attacks. 

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New procedure enhances quality of life for prostate cancer patients

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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A treatment that can remove prostate cancer while still preserving a man’s quality of life is now available in the United States for the first time ever.  It’s called high-intensity focused ultrasound, or HIFU.  There’s no hospital stay, no knife, almost no down time and few side effects. 

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Norovirus: What it is and how it's detected?

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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As many as 21 million people a year are sickened by the norovirus. But as contagious as it is, there are still a lot of questions surrounding how it’s transmitted. 

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Herpes virus fights cancer

The FDA says about 74,000 Americans were diagnosed with melanoma, a type of skin cancer. Last year, nearly 10,000 of them died of it. (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) The FDA says about 74,000 Americans were diagnosed with melanoma, a type of skin cancer. Last year, nearly 10,000 of them died of it. (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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The FDA says about 74,000 Americans were diagnosed with melanoma, a type of skin cancer. Last year, nearly 10,000 of them died of it. Now, researchers have a new weapon in their arsenal; one that comes from a genetically-altered herpes virus. Here’s more about the first cancer-killing viral therapy ever approved in the U.S. 

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News 9 MD: Immunotherapy fighting advanced cancer Video included

Patients with advanced cancers have new hope thanks to immunotherapy.  It's a therapy that trains the body's own immune system to search out and destroy the cancer cells. Patients with advanced cancers have new hope thanks to immunotherapy. It's a therapy that trains the body's own immune system to search out and destroy the cancer cells.
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Patients with advanced cancers have new hope thanks to immunotherapy. It’s a therapy that trains the body’s own immune system to search out and destroy the cancer cells. Researchers say they’ve found an accurate way to screen the patients who may respond well to this treatment.  

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Type 1 Diabetes Cure?

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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A medication called Verapamil is a common treatment for controlling blood pressure, but researchers have stumbled onto another possible use for it: curing type-one diabetes. A first-of-its-kind trial is now underway, and it could be the cure for what is currently the seventh leading cause of death in the U.S.

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Knee pain: Is it all in your hips?

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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If you think about it, running is a one-legged sport with only one leg pushing off the ground at a time. How it lands is the key to one physical therapist’s approach to keeping his running clients out of pain. Three words to remember: sound, strides and steps.

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Foot fat transplant

Doctors are studying a new procedure to cushion the feet using a patient’s own cells. (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) Doctors are studying a new procedure to cushion the feet using a patient’s own cells. (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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Imagine feeling excruciating pain every time you take a step. For some cyclists and runners, years of devotion to their sport results in something called fat pad atrophy; fat at the balls of the feet wears away, leaving nothing but bone.  Now doctors are studying a new procedure to cushion the feet using a patient’s own cells. 

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ViaScan for the heart

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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About 610,000 people die of heart disease every year in the United States and stress tests don’t always pick up the problem.  A new body scanner could provide a medical breakthrough in early detection and save lives. 

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DBS for obsessive compulsive disorder

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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People with obsessive compulsive disorder or OCD have compulsive thoughts and are driven by excessive habits that may seem impossible to break. In the past when therapy and medication didn’t work, patients had few other options. Now, a surgery that has been successful in treating patients with Parkinson’s disease is now helping people cope with OCD. 

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SBRT for liver tumors

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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Stereotactic body radiation therapy or SBRT uses high doses of focused radiation at different angles to precisely target cancer cells while leaving other critical tissues unharmed. Doctors have used SBRT to treat a variety of cancers, but a new study shows it may make a huge difference in patients with tough-to-treat liver cancer. 

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Burning mouth syndrome

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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A burning sensation in the mouth that just won’t go away, no matter what someone tries. Sufferers are searching for help and doctors are looking for answers. We have more details on this unusual condition called burning mouth syndrome. 

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Changing lives one limb, one light at a time

A company called Design Revolution – or D-Rev– is developing and delivering high quality medical equipment that people in low-income countries can afford.(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) A company called Design Revolution – or D-Rev– is developing and delivering high quality medical equipment that people in low-income countries can afford.(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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Many medical companies develop products aimed at middle-class consumers. But one company is making its products for the poorest people in the world. Four billion people live on less than four dollars a day, and a company called Design Revolution – or D-Rev– is developing and delivering high quality medical equipment that people in low-income countries can afford.

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New FDA approved drug to treat Multiple Sclerosis

A newly-approved therapy that may help some patients put the brakes on MS.  (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) A newly-approved therapy that may help some patients put the brakes on MS.  (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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About 400,000 Americans are living with multiple sclerosis. Ten thousand new cases are diagnosed every year. MS is a disease of the central nervous system.  Among other things, it can cause pain and fatigue, and problems with vision and movement. Those symptoms can get progressively worse.  A newly-approved therapy that may help some patients put the brakes on the disease. 

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Dog sniffs out ovarian cancer

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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Ovarian cancer is called the silent killer because by the time most women get diagnosed, it’s too late. Most women mistake the symptoms for constipation. But now, dogs are sticking their nose in the middle of a groundbreaking study, and it could be the key to an early diagnosis. 

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Cryoablation therapy for cancer patients can help amputees

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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Cryoablation therapy has long been used to treat pain in cancer patients. But now, a doctor at Emory University is trying it out on other types of nerve pain, and what he’s finding could bring pain relief to millions of amputees suffering from phantom limb pain.  We take a look at one of the first patients to try this experimental procedure. 

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Urolift fixes enlarged prostate

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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Getting the diagnosis of an enlarged prostate has often meant life won’t ever be the same and certainly not as enjoyable. But thanks to a new FDA-approved procedure, the prognosis can be a lot brighter. 

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SculpSure Fat Melter - a doctor's in-depth interview

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It's an FDA-approved procedure for fat reduction and a doctor gives an in-depth interview of the SculpSure Fat Melter.

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SLIT therapy for seasonal allergies

Allergy specialists in Pittsburgh have a new treatment available for patients with moderate or serious grass allergies. It’s called sublingual immunotherapy, or SLIT. (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) Allergy specialists in Pittsburgh have a new treatment available for patients with moderate or serious grass allergies. It’s called sublingual immunotherapy, or SLIT. (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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Itchy, watery eyes, runny nose and lots of congestion. If you suffer from seasonal allergies, you know the feeling all too well. Allergy sufferers can take over-the-counter medication or have a series of shots, but a new therapy may be easier on patients and may eliminate symptoms once and for all. 

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Concussions and young athletes: New CON-TEX study

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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The U.S. Centers for Disease Control reports 3.8 million sports concussions a year, not just in football, but in all sports, among all ages. The pros get a lot of attention, but what is the best treatment for young athletes? Researchers are working now to answer that question. 

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Pinhole treatment for receding gums

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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For one out of 10 people who wore braces, the end result isn’t a perfect smile. That’s because they develop receding gums. Treatment typically involves expensive and painful grafting, but there’s a new treatment that has no scalpel, no stitches, and very little recovery time. 

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The fight against facial fat

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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As we age, the shape of our face changes. For some, the cheeks may become thinner, and pockets of fat may develop near the neck just under the chin.  Now, a newly-approved procedure may be a huge help to some who are fighting facial fat. 

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Inspirational athlete overcomes major surgeries

Kearci Smith is recovering from major heart and lung surgeries. (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) Kearci Smith is recovering from major heart and lung surgeries. (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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Recovering from heart or lung surgery takes strength and a great attitude, both of which are tough to muster after an operation. That’s where a woman training for the Olympics is a huge help in one rehab facility. 

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Blocking heart disease: Drug the bugs!

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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Heart disease is the number one killer of men and women in the U.S. It accounts for one in four deaths. Scientists are searching for ways to save hearts and lives, and the newest research has them focusing on the gut. 

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'Black girls code' hopes for more minorities in STEM careers

Science, technology, engineering and mathematics — they are known as the stem fields, and they are looking for women, especially minority women, to fill positions.(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) Science, technology, engineering and mathematics — they are known as the stem fields, and they are looking for women, especially minority women, to fill positions.(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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Science, technology, engineering and mathematics — they are known as the stem fields, and they are looking for women, especially minority women, to fill positions. The problem is there aren’t enough qualified females to fill the jobs. That’s where Kimberly Bryant steps in. Her mission is to change the way black girls think about science, and open up their minds to a whole new way of life. 

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Eye cancer: Microsurgery

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Michelle Martin’s tumor was tiny, about the size of half of a pea, but it was in the back of her eye. She had a cancer called ocular melanoma. Now, cutting-edge instruments are making all the difference in diagnosis and treatment. 

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The good doctor

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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Forty seven percent of the applicants were women, and studies show they still face continuing bias against women in medicine. But one woman was able to prove that women are leaders in medicine, and she did so by building a major medical school. 

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Visualase for brain tumors

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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For people with brain tumors, treatment usually involves invasive surgery as surgeons open portions of the skull to remove the cancer. If a tumor comes back, patients may begin to run out of options.  A new FDA- approved device, also used to treat epilepsy, is now giving some patients another chance.

More>>

Dissolving stents: Do your homework

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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For decades, treating coronary heart disease involved using tiny metal stents to prop open clogged arteries in the heart. Once they’re in, they don’t come out which doctors’ say can cause problems. But a new type of stent has been in the works for 15 years and it was finally put to the test and this one is fueling hope for 850,000 patients and their doctors.

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Blood pressure: How low should you go?

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As many as one in three people in the U.S. have high blood pressure. But when it comes to the numbers and your heart health, how low should you go? That’s the question researchers attempted to answer in a landmark study some cardiologists are calling the most important blood pressure study in 40 years. It’s called the Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial or SPRINT.  

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Robotic surgery for AFib

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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Atrial fibrillation, or AFib, is a condition that causes a person’s heart to beat out of rhythm. It can cause severe discomfort and may even be a risk factor for stroke. Now, cardiologists are now turning to robotic technology to treat patients. 

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Common cold, common myths

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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The common cold is fittingly named. Separating the facts from the myths may cut down your chances of catching it.

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Tapeworms, good for your body?

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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It sounds like a bad horror movie: losing control of your body. When it happened to one man, doctors thought a brain tumor was to blame. But turns out, the culprits were tapeworms. And that was good news and it happens more often than you think. 

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Safety net for peanut allergies

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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You’ve heard of fighting fire with fire. How about treating peanut allergies with peanuts? It’s a new approach to a potentially deadly threat that terrifies parents of allergic children. One brave child is helping researchers in their search for a peanut allergy cure. 

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Tips to curb your appetite

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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We’ve all heard about too many ‘miracle diets’ that promise much and often deliver little.  But the ‘eating experts’ — clinical dieticians — say it is possible to eat less, lose weight and keep it off. 

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Personalized cancer treatment: It’s in your DNA

Joseph & Barbara Italiano (Source: Ivanhoe Newswie) Joseph & Barbara Italiano (Source: Ivanhoe Newswie)
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When someone goes through chemo and radiation to fight cancer the most devastating news is that the cancer has come back. But now, thanks to groundbreaking treatments tailored to each individual patient’s genetic makeup, some may have new hope. 

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Common dementia drug found to improve Parkinson's symptoms

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A commonly prescribed dementia drug could hold the key to helping prevent debilitating falls for people with Parkinson's, scientists have discovered. Parkinson's affects approximately seven million worldwide. Seventy percent  of people with Parkinson's will fall at least once a year, with over a third experiencing falls repeatedly, resulting in fractures, broken bones and hospital admissions. 

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Transplant surgeon: One in a million

Dr. Tiffany Anthony (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) Dr. Tiffany Anthony (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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The number of men and women entering medical school these days is about evenly split. However, women make up less than 20 percent of the surgeons in this country.  Smart women like Tiffany Anthony, MD, Liver, Kidney and Pancreas Transplant Surgeon at Baylor Scott and White Hospital in Dallas, are changing that. Dr. Anthony is one busy surgeon. She’s one of only about 50 female transplant surgeons in the world.

More>>

Lynparza for advanced ovarian cancer

Connie Scrivens (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) Connie Scrivens (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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This year alone, 21,000 women will be diagnosed with ovarian cancer. Of those, 14,000 will die. Because the symptoms are so subtle, most women aren’t diagnosed until they are in the late stages of the disease.  Now there is a new treatment that is bringing hope to some patients who have exhausted all other options. 

More>>

Immunotherapy: Fighting advanced cancer

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
Updated:

Patients with advanced cancers have new hope thanks to immunotherapy. It’s a therapy that trains the body’s own immune system to search out and destroy the cancer cells.  Researchers say they’ve found an accurate way to screen the patients who may respond well to this treatment. 

More>>

Fast Food Nutrition Tips

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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Fast food is a mainstay in most American households and it's impacting the health of kids every day. One study says a child can pack on six extra pounds every year by eating a diet with a lot of fast food. Parents need to be talking about it the way we discuss what’s on the dinner table. 

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Hepatitis C: the costly cure?

(Source: CDC.gov) (Source: CDC.gov)
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Millions of Americans have Hepatitis C, a chronic disease that ravages your liver and in some cases can be deadly. New drugs can cure the virus, but that’s only good news for some people.

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DUOPA for Parkinson’s patients

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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Patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease can have an increasingly tough time regulating their medication. Now, they may have a better way to keep their drugs and their daily lives more consistent with DUOPA which recently received FDA approval.  

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Worried sick? Send stress away!

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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A recent survey shows women hit their “stress peak” at age 34 and have their lowest amount of stress at age 25.

More>>

Not All Fats Are Created Equal

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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For more than a generation, fat was a dirty word. Nutritionists and dieticians urged us to ban it whenever we could. But that message didn’t work. We just gained more weight. Now, food experts are telling us not all fats are bad. 

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Roger Technology Goes to School

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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If you have a cell phone, a television or even a fitness device...you’ve probably benefited from Bluetooth technology. Now, Bluetooth-type technology is stepping into the classroom to create a “user-friendly” environment for the hearing impaired. There is a new system that allows teachers to be heard by students, no matter where they are.

More>>

Dishwasher Dont's

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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Experts say more than 40 percent of American couples fight about loading the dishwasher. Should you pre-rinse or not? Place utensil handles up or down? Simple questions that can have multiple opinions. So what’s the right way to load your dishwasher for the ultimate clean? The answer depends on who you ask. More>>

Mastectomy Makeover

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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For women having a mastectomy to reduce their genetic risk of getting breast cancer, a recently published study looks at a new technique to rebuild the breast which claims to have better cosmetic results than traditional reconstruction. More>>

Asthma attacks: 6 hidden triggers

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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The CDC reports one in 12 people have asthma. Of those, half have had an asthma attack in the last year that could have been prevented. But knowing the hidden triggers could save you a trip to the ER…or even end up saving your life.You can blame weeds, trees and grass if you’re coughing and wheezing...but not all asthma attacks are set off by the usual suspects. Here are six hidden triggers that could set off allergies that trigger an asthma attack. More>>

College students check in at mental health kiosk

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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 At least one estimate says almost one out of every 10 college students seriously considered suicide. A lot of people don’t want to even talk about it. But one university is the first in the U.S. to give students the tools they need right at their fingertips to fight those deadly odds. More>>

Win the battle of the bulge

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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They’re called love handles but let’s face it, no one really loves them. Now, a new non-invasive fat blasting technology can help you say goodbye to unwanted fat around your midsection. More>>

NEWS 9 MD: Slowing ALS

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This year, more than 5,600 people in the United States will be told they have ALS. Within five years, many of them will be robbed of their ability to work, to walk, to even talk... until one day, they won’t even be able to breathe. More>>

Help for Incontinence

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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Incontinence is an uncomfortable and embarrassing problem for many people, especially as they age. It used to be treated with surgery but that wasn’t always successful. A new outpatient procedure has changed that. It’s also changing lives. More>>

To statin or not to statin?

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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Heart disease is the top killer of Americans and experts say there is no doubt that high cholesterol plays a big part. Cholesterol-lowering drugs or statins are “game-changers” for many patients, but for millions of Americans and their doctors it may be tough to decide whether to statin, or not. More>>

Retrievable stents for strokes

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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When someone suffers a stroke, time is critical. For every few minutes that blood and oxygen are blocked, portions of the brain suffer irreversible damage. Now, a technique designed to remove clots from large vessels in the brain may be highly effective in reducing stroke’s life-altering side effects. More>>

New treatment for brain cancer

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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Glioblastoma is the most common brain tumor in adults, representing about 17 percent of all cases, and it is very aggressive. Now, there is technology to fight it and new hope where there wasn’t much before. More>>

Esophageal cancer: killing a silent killer

Raymond Stravato (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) Raymond Stravato (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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This year alone, 17,000 Americans will be diagnosed with esophageal cancer and 16,000 of them will die from it. People who have Barrett’s esophagus, a condition where normal tissue in the esophagus changes due to acid reflux, are at the highest risk of getting the disease. Now, there is more information on treatment options for those with this difficult disease. More>>

Is there such a thing as healthy obesity?

Jennifer Boeving (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) Jennifer Boeving (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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More than 30-percent of Americans are considered obese.  The extra fat puts them at risk for diabetes, stroke and heart attack. But are all obese people unhealthy? Some could actually be healthier than their skinny friends. More>>

A step toward avoiding amputation from diabetes

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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Diabetics who become increasingly obese are in danger of an ailment that often leads to amputation of their feet.  Now, there’s a breakthrough treatment that's become a last-chance option. More>>

Girl receives double lung transplant

Rachel Sweet (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) Rachel Sweet (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
Updated:

Life gets turned upside down when you’re hit by a life-threatening disease. Usually, everything else gets put on hold. But a teenage girl who underwent a double lung transplant just to live wanted something else. More>>

EOS scanner for scoliosis

(source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
Updated:

Scoliosis, or a curvature of the spine, is a structural problem affecting as many as seven million Americans. While it affects both genders, females are eight times more likely to require treatment, including braces and spinal fusion surgery, and that can mean dozens, even hundreds of X-rays.  Now, there’s finally a breakthrough in X-ray technology that takes two extremely clear full-body images of a patient’s surgically-repaired spine. More>>

Hope for pediatric cancer

Jennifer Kranz (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) Jennifer Kranz (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
Updated:

Billions of dollars are pumped into research to try and find a cure for pediatric cancer. But for the 14,000 children who are told they have it, much fewer resources are available. One family is trying to change that, and is determined to save the lives of as many kids as they can. More>>

6 foods that can help eat away at depression

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
Updated:

More than 17,000,000 people suffer from it, but 6 million people will not get help for their depression. Some don’t want the stigma that comes along with it, or even believe they have it. While others don’t want to take mind altering drugs or have the money to seek help.  More>>

Balloons for weight loss

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
Updated:

Diets, drugs, supplements, and surgery. These are all ways people try to lose weight. But a controversial report in the New York Times claims only half the people who try to lose those extra pounds actually keep the weight off. Now, there’s a new, non-surgical approach that could help you finally shed 30, 40, even 50 pounds. More>>

New procedure could shine a light on endometriosis diagnoses

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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More than 6 million American women and girls struggle with endometriosis, a chronic condition that causes pain before and after their menstrual cycle. More>>

Ditching depression with yoga

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
Updated:

For millions of Americans saddled with depression and prescription medications have been the only solution offered to them. But some researchers think a yoga mat may be just as effective. More>>

Battling skin cancer on the beach

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
Updated:

Nearly 70,000 new cases of melanoma are diagnosed every year, and 10,000 people die from it. Most can be prevented by cutting exposure to the sun’s harmful ultraviolet rays, and some communities across the country are supplying outdoor lovers with one proven weapon against skin cancer. More>>

New medication to save sight from diabetes

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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Diabetes is a leading cause of blindness in American adults. Partially because it is often missed until it's too late. Now, a new treatment is helping save patients’ sight. More>>

Top Three Best Diets

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
Updated:

As many as 45 million Americans diet every year, and spend an estimated $33 billion in weight loss products.re good y... More>>

Laser technology helping epilepsy patients

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
Updated:

Three million people in the United States live with epilepsy, a brain disorder that causes sudden, unpredictable seizures. Surgery is often considered a last resort, but new laser technology is making it easier on patients. More>>

News 9 MD: Stem cells for diabetes

Updated:

Three million Americans have Type-1 diabetes, a disease where the immune system stops the pancreas from making insulin. Patients rely on daily blood sugar checks and insulin injections to survive, but now there's hope on the horizon.  More>>

Spinal injury? REACT to the rescue

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
Updated:

They are devastating injuries. A fall, a sports accident and suddenly, your spinal cord is damaged. It happens 300,000 times a year in this country.Some people give up, but many are fighting back at a special recovery center. More>>

New surgical techniques can correct hammertoe

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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The traditional method of fixing hammertoe can be painful, and require weeks of rehab. Now, a new procedure is making it easier for patients with hammertoe to get back on their feet. More>>

Vanderbilt University creates technology to help HIV research

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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More than 30 years have passed since the discovery of the human immunodeficiency virus, or HIV, and scientists are still struggling to develop a vaccine. But researchers at Vanderbilt University in Nashville have used an unconventional method to get one step closer.  More>>

Open wide: dental myths debunked

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
Updated:

There are lots of myths when it comes to your teeth. How much do you know? There’s the good, the bad, and the ugly. More>>

Helping your baby sleep better

(source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
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The average new parent loses 1,056 hours of sleep the first year of their child’s life — that’s almost 44 days! The deprivation can be even worse if a child has trouble going to sleep. Now, some parents are turning to sleep coaches while some pediatricians are asking why? More>>

Stressed out? There's an app for that!

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
Updated:

Stress keeps more than 40 percent of Americans lying awake at night and the impacts can be felt both in our minds and bodies. Experts say the first step toward relief is figuring out the cause. Now, the answers could be at your fingertips. More>>

Better workout: yoga or gym?

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
Updated:

So which workout is best? Yoga, stretching, balance and core strength. Or the gym, pounding the treadmill, pushing up the heart rate.  More>>

Botox stops sweating

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
Updated:

Millions of people use Botox to smooth out wrinkles on their forehead and erase crow’s feet around the eyes, but Botox, the brand name for what’s called botulinum toxin, is most widely used for medical conditions and the results can be life-changing. More>>

  • TOP HEADLINESMore>>

  • Artificial disc replacement

    Artificial disc replacement

    Tuesday, September 22 2015 8:14 AM EDT2015-09-22 12:14:10 GMT
    Tuesday, September 22 2015 8:22 AM EDT2015-09-22 12:22:48 GMT
    (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)
    Even though most back problems get better on their own, about 600,000 Americans opt for surgery every year. Spinal fusion is the most common approach, but more and more people are choosing another technique.More >>
    Even though most back problems get better on their own, about 600,000 Americans opt for surgery every year. Spinal fusion is the most common approach, but more and more people are choosing another technique.More >>
  • HEALTHMore>>

  • Flu activity increases in the state

    Flu activity increases in the state

    Tuesday, February 23 2016 11:31 PM EST2016-02-24 04:31:45 GMT
    Tuesday, February 23 2016 11:33 PM EST2016-02-24 04:33:22 GMT
    Health officials are encouraging you to get the flu shotHealth officials are encouraging you to get the flu shot

    Flu activity is increasing in Georgia late in the season. Health officials say they've seen the number of flu hospitalizations double in the last couple of weeks. 

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    Flu activity is increasing in Georgia late in the season. Health officials say they've seen the number of flu hospitalizations double in the last couple of weeks. 

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  • SEGMENT: Health with Dr. Paula: Avoiding dehydration

    SEGMENT: Health with Dr. Paula: Avoiding dehydration

    Wednesday, February 24 2016 9:23 AM EST2016-02-24 14:23:42 GMT
    Wednesday, February 24 2016 9:24 PM EST2016-02-25 02:24:02 GMT
    Dr. Paula Walker-King stopped by to tell us the warning signs of dehydration.Dr. Paula Walker-King stopped by to tell us the warning signs of dehydration.

    Doctors say as many as 75 percent of Americans live in a chronic state of dehydration. Dr. Paula Walker-King tells us the warning signs of dehydration

    More >>

    Doctors say as many as 75 percent of Americans live in a chronic state of dehydration. Dr. Paula Walker-King tells us the warning signs of dehydration

    More >>

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