MCSD school board debate on class sizes and graduation rates - WTVM.com-Columbus, GA News Weather & Sports

MCSD school board debate on class sizes and graduation rates

COLUMBUS, GA (WTVM) -

From class size to graduation rates, the Muscogee County School Board is making decisions and discussing serious issues that have an impact on you and your child. 

The board voted to approve a proposal for an increase in the maximum of students allowed in each class.  For some classes this fall, there could be up to three more students added if needed.

"Nothing is set in stone.  You may have one more student.  You may have two more students, or you may have three more students per class," said Muscogee County School District spokesperson Valerie Fuller.  "It is dictated by the number of students we actually have enrolled, what subject matter is being taught, and the number of teachers needed to teach each subject."

Fuller says the increase is just a precaution, and they will not know for sure if class size will increase until registration later this year.         

She says despite the possible increase learning will still be the center of the classroom.

"Our teachers have done an excellent job of coping with the budget crunch as well as the other employees throughout the district."

The new calculation of the Muscogee County graduation rate was a discussion point at Monday's meeting. 

With the new formula adopted by the state, it seems as though the county's graduation rate dropped about 16 points compared to the rate determined by the old calculation formula.  School Board Member Cathy Williams says the new method is unfair.

"The graduation rate in Columbus is going up.  It has been going up for the last several years.  That has not changed.  We are still going up.  It is just that we don't count students who don't graduate in those four years," said Williams.

While the school system is working to make sure parents understand the new rate, they are also focusing on ways to help schools that are not performing as well as others.

"We are looking at what we doing in those schools to ensure that those students have every opportunity to be a successful graduate in four years," said Williams.

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