Minden bunker blast 911 tapes released - WTVM.com-Columbus, GA News Weather & Sports

Minden bunker blast 911 tapes released

On Monday evening, the Webster Parish 911 call center was inundated with more than 300 calls from panicked residents -- in less than an hour. The underground bunker explosion at Camp Minden had Minden residents on edge, wondering what the cause of the blast was.

Several of the callers confused the loud explosion with someone trying to break into their home. 911 call center dispatchers with the Webster Parish Sheriff's Office tell KSLA News 12 that extra employees had to be called into work to handle the demand of the high call volume.

KSLA News 12 has reported that the blast occurred at an underground bunker operated by Explo Systems Inc. on land leased by Camp Minden. While Explo Inc. is responsible for the housing of the munitions, the cause of the blast is still unknown.

KSLA News 12 reached out to Explo Inc, leaving several messages. None of those messages have been returned.

Copyright 2012 KSLA. All rights reserved.

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