LSU PD cracks down on bike riders who break traffic laws - WTVM.com-Columbus, GA News Weather & Sports

LSU PD cracks down on bike riders who break traffic laws

BATON ROUGE, LA (WAFB) -

The LSU Police Department is cracking down on bicyclists who break traffic laws. It's a part of their campaign to cut the number of pedestrians and cyclists injured in accidents around campus.

It's common sight around campus these days: seeing LSU police officers writing tickets to bike riders. Cyclists are expected to abide by the same rules of the road as drivers of motor vehicles. But now they are more likely to get a ticket for a violation because of a safety campaign that began a few weeks ago. The campaign came to be because of the number of accidents involving pedestrians, cyclists and cars.

"Since the beginning of the year for the entire year of 2012 so far we've had a total of 27 incidents in which we had a traffic crash involving a motor vehicle and or a bicycle," said Captain Cory Lalonde.

LSU police Captain Cory Lalonde says they are already starting to see changes on campus with only one accident since they beefed up enforcement.

"Traffic stops and issuing citations is the number one way that we as law enforcement can change people's behavior," said Lalonde.

Some bike riders on campus say the citations are a bit extreme.

"I mean it all sounded kind of silly. I mean, we're on bikes...we're not really driving cars here," said Samuel Stuart, who bikes around campus.

"When I called in to find out who much the fine was, it was $148.25," said Bran Wagner, a bike rider. "Also this ticket is a moving violation, which will also affect my driving insurance."

But those who travel through campus on foot say stricter enforcement makes them feel more safe.

"I always worry if I'm in an intersection if the biker is going to stop," said Daniel Wend, a pedestrian. "I'd hate to run into him just because I don't want to hurt myself. I don't want to hurt them either."

Captain Lalonde says this campaign is also a way to re-educate drivers bikers and walkers about traffic laws within campus. Bike rider Bran Wagner says the only real solution would be to close off campus to cars.

Copyright 2012 WAFB. All rights reserved.

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