Physical therapy students help heal ASU's athletes - WTVM.com-Columbus, GA News Weather & Sports

Physical therapy students help heal ASU's athletes

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Alabama State University's Department of Physical Therapy now is among fewer than 10 programs offering students real-world experience in the use of a diagnostic ultrasound machine, which is a device that is a "God-send" for some injuries received by athletes.

The machine, which is being used as a training tool for students at Alabama State University, and at the same time as part of post-surgery treatment for ASU athletes, places the University on the cutting edge of new technology in the physical therapy field.

ASU physical therapy program alumnus Dr. Julian Magee ('07), assistant professor of physical therapy and a liaison to the ASU athletic department, said the machine serves as an educational and clinical tool.

"As a clinical tool, it can help in the diagnosis or recognition of musculoskeletal injuries, such as tendon tears, some bone injuries, ligamentous injuries, etc. As an educational tool, it can be used to visualize structures in the human body that will allow students to have better understanding of courses such as Gross Anatomy and Functional Anatomy, as well as other classes," Magee said. "It has a myriad of uses in the clinic and in the classroom."

Dr. Steven Chesbro, dean of ASU's College of Health Sciences, said the machine gives students a chance to gain practical and theoretical experience.

"Having access to the diagnostic ultrasound machine allows the program to prepare students to use this technology in practice and aids them in the learning process by allowing them to visualize what is occurring below the surface. This technology also allows the faculty and students to engage in new and exciting research related to the use of diagnostic ultrasound in clinical practice," Chesbro said.

Magee adds that students aren't the only ones who benefit from the machine.

"We currently have a clinic where we work with University athletes, and this will allow our students to become stronger clinicians and give them another tool to help in their evaluation. This will benefit the community by allowing the DPT program at ASU to host conferences and continuing education seminars, as well as consult with local hospitals, clinics and physician groups," Magee said.

INFORMATION SOURCE: Alabama State University

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