Jean-Michel Cousteau to kick-off the ‘BLUE on Tour’ festival at - WTVM.com-Columbus, GA News Weather & Sports

Jean-Michel Cousteau to kick-off the ‘BLUE on Tour’ festival at Auburn University

Jean-Michel Cousteau (source: Facebook) Jean-Michel Cousteau (source: Facebook)
AUBURN, AL (WTVM) -

As part of No Impact Week 2013, the Auburn University College of Liberal Arts will host "BLUE on Tour," a traveling film festival and conservation event that provides access to filmmakers and marine experts. 

Jean-Michel Cousteau will open the three-day festival with a screening of his film, "My Father the Captain: Jacques-Yves Cousteau," followed by discussion and a signing of his book of the same title on Thursday, March 21, at 5 p.m. in Biggin Hall, room 05.

BLUE on Tour is BLUE Ocean Film Festival's traveling film event, which brings ocean and conservation films and speakers to locations around the world with the goal of spreading education and raising awareness on the condition of our oceans. 

A complete list of films and related events to be held Thursday, March 21, through Saturday, March 23, can be found here.

Copyright 2013 WTVM. All rights reserved. 

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