Man shot after attacking sheriff's deputy - WTVM.com-Columbus, GA News Weather & Sports

Man shot after attacking sheriff's deputy

Zebulun Kennedy (Source: LPSO) Zebulun Kennedy (Source: LPSO)
Blythe Millet Blythe Millet
LIVINGSTON PARISH, LA (WAFB) -

A Livingston man was shot after allegedly attacking a deputy Sunday.

According to reports, Zebulun Kennedy, 25, charged the deputy, knocked him to the ground and continued attacking him.  The deputy drew his gun in self-defense and fired twice, hitting Kennedy, who then fled.

Kennedy was caught after a foot chase by other deputies.  He was taken to the hospital for treatment of non-life threatening injuries, released and taken to jail.

Kennedy has been charged with second degree battery, resisting an officer with force or violence, domestic abuse battery, possession of hallucinogenic substances, manufacture of hallucinogenic substances and simple battery.  His bond was set at $250,000.

Blythe Millet, 26, was also arrested in connection with the case.  She has been charged with possession of hallucinogenic substances and manufacture of hallucinogenic substances.  Her bond was set at $50,000.

Copyright 2013 WAFB. All rights reserved.

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