Ala. airport undergoing $1 million upgrade - WTVM.com-Columbus, GA News Weather & Sports

Ala. airport undergoing $1 million upgrade

MGN Online- Photo Credit: Courtesy: Wiki Commons MGN Online- Photo Credit: Courtesy: Wiki Commons

MUSCLE SHOALS, Ala. (AP) - The Northwest Alabama Regional Airport is in the midst of a roughly $1 million upgrade that officials expect to be finished by the end of the year.

Director of the Muscle Shoals airport Barry Griffith tells the TimesDaily of Florence (http://bit.ly/12Tq4id ) the airport's last upgrade happened about 20 years ago and the building has started showing signs of deterioration in certain areas.

Officials say the upgrades are expected to improve the airport's energy efficiency. The upgrades call for building new interior walls, a new roof and installing moisture barriers to help alleviate problems that could cause water damage.

Mark Reiter, a project manager for the Michael Baker Corp. -the airport's aviation consultant - says the upgrades will help begin to transition the airport into a transportation gateway to the Shoals.

 

Information from: TimesDaily, http://www.timesdaily.com/

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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