A local hero makes his final flight - WTVM.com-Columbus, GA News Weather & Sports

A local hero makes his final flight

TUCSON, AZ (Tucson News Now) -

It's the final flight for 25-year-old Billy Warneke, as a Black Hawk helicopter flew in his remains from Prescott to Marana on Wednesday.

Friends, family and first responders from across the region were there to honor our local hero.

"It's important to show his family that he will never be forgotten by the community, by the Blue Star moms he served in the military, and he'll never be forgotten.

A fire engine then carried his flag-draped casket to his funeral services.

People lined the streets to pay their respects.

It was a traditional military and firefighter service with hundreds of first responders, including Hotshot and fire crews from around the region.

"When we play pipes and drums, it's just a way to recognize the sacrifices he made and the sacrifices his family continues to make."

It was an emotional time for mourners as they said their final goodbyes.

As this 25-year-old is laid to rest, he leaves behind a wife, an unborn child and family from all over the country.

But his family says it is his legacy that will forever live on.

"Billy is a good guy, strong, strong military vet, loved firefighters. He's very appreciative I'm sure, he's very happy."

Copyright 2013 Tucson News Now. All rights reserved.

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