Schermerhorn lineup aims to attract wider, younger audience - WTVM.com-Columbus, GA News Weather & Sports

Schermerhorn lineup aims to attract wider, younger audience

NASHVILLE, TN (WSMV) -

Audiences have grown accustomed to hearing beautiful orchestral music at the renowned Schermerhorn Symphony Center, but the downtown concert hall is shaking things up a bit.

Ticket sales haven't been big enough to pull the symphony out of an $82 million debt. In fact, last month, it put the performance hall on the verge of foreclosure, before a private investor bailed the center out.

Now, leaders want to draw big crowds with performances you probably wouldn't expect. That includes comedians, plays and some entertaining variety.

"If America's Got Talent or a concert like that is going to be that reason why someone is going to take that first opportunity to come down here to the hall, then that's what we'll do," said Jonathan Norris, with the Schermerhorn Symphony Center.

Other shows in the upcoming schedule include Hal Holbrook in Mark Twain Tonight, Huey Lewis and the News and Foreigner.

The plan is to have something for everyone in the family, while keeping the prices reasonable. Admission to each of the new shows starts at $29 a ticket.

Those tickets go on sale this week. For more information, visit: http://www..nashvillesymphony.org.

Copyright 2013 WSMV (Meredith Corporation). All rights reserved.

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