Adoptable Pets of the Day: August 12 - WTVM.com-Columbus, GA News Weather & Sports

Adoptable Pets of the Day: August 12

Tag 88 Tag 88
Tag 353 Tag 353
Tag 323 Tag 323
Tag 91 Tag 91
(WTVM) -

There's no better time to give a deserving animal a second chance atlife. These pets at Columbus Animal Care and Control are eager to meet you, andbecome the newest member of your family.

Tag 88 is a male domestic shorthaired kitten with black fur that isplayful and curious. He deserves to be part of a family and forever home.

Tag 353 is an adult female black Labrador retriever hopes you’ve gotplenty of energy, because she can’t wait to play with her new family!  

Tag 323 is an adult female domestic shorthaired tortoiseshell cat wholoves attention and spending time with people. She is sure to be an excellentfamily pet.

Tag 91 is an adult female black and white Heeler mix. She’s deaf, butthe amount of love she’ll show her new family with speak volumes.

For more information onhow you can help these deserving pets find a home, visit Columbus Animal Careand Control at 4910 Milgen Road or call them at (706) 653-4512. You canalso visit their official website

 

Copyright 2013 WTVM. All rightsreserved.

 

  • Trending StoriesTrending StoriesMore>>

  • Deadly virus threatens local crawfish industry

    Deadly virus threatens local crawfish industry

    Tuesday, May 23 2017 7:26 PM EDT2017-05-23 23:26:19 GMT

    A deadly virus is threatening the crawfish industry in Southwest Louisiana. It's called white spot syndrome virus and it was first discovered in Thailand, but somehow it made its way to ponds in South Louisiana and specialists are struggling to find the funds to research a solution.  “The catch was increasing and increasing and then it dropped 70% and that's when you saw the dead crawfish floating in the water,” said a crawfish farmer of 34 years, Ian Garbarino. He...

    More >>

    A deadly virus is threatening the crawfish industry in Southwest Louisiana. It's called white spot syndrome virus and it was first discovered in Thailand, but somehow it made its way to ponds in South Louisiana and specialists are struggling to find the funds to research a solution.  “The catch was increasing and increasing and then it dropped 70% and that's when you saw the dead crawfish floating in the water,” said a crawfish farmer of 34 years, Ian Garbarino. He...

    More >>
Powered by Frankly