Mesa woman sentenced to 12 years in her niece's 2008 death - WTVM.com-Columbus, GA News Weather & Sports

UPDATE

Mesa woman sentenced to 12 years in her niece's 2008 death

(Source: CBS 5 News) (Source: CBS 5 News)

A Mesa woman was sentenced today to 12 years for manslaughter in the 2008 death of her 3-year-old niece.

34-year-old Latisha L. Breckenridge entered a guilty plea in August.

Breckenridge was arrested by Mesa police in April 2008 on suspicion of second-degree murder and child abuse in the death of Juliana Ruiz.

Police say Breckenridge originally told investigators the girl fell off a recliner and stopped breathing on March 19, 2008.

The girl was taken to a hospital, where she was pronounced dead.

The county Medical Examiner's Office say an autopsy showed the child's death wasn't caused by the fall described by Breckenridge.

Police interviewed Breckenridge again and say she admitted to getting angry with the girl and grabbing, pushing and tossing her.

Copyright 2013 Associated Press. All rights reserved.  CBS 5 (KPHO Broadcasting Corporation) contributed to this report.

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