Community remembers man shot and killed at Club Ciroc - WTVM.com-Columbus, GA News Weather & Sports

Community remembers man shot and killed at Club Ciroc

COLUMBUS, GA (WTVM) -

Harry Short's aunt fought back tears as she reflected deeply on the young man that their family and community knew and loved.

There was standing room only inside the church Saturday afternoon, September 21, as hundreds came to pay their respects to a man who many say never stopped smiling.

"That smile, he always kept a smile on his face. He always had a smile on his face," Ms. Sims said.

Hundreds packed into New Providence Baptist Church off of Veterans Parkway in Columbus to pay tribute to Harry Short Jr.

Short's life was celebrated through song and inspiring words from family members, coaches, and friends.

"He was more just like a big brother, because he always put me up on game, and talked to me, and let me know what was up, and he didn't sugar coat anything," Keilah Jones said.

Several of Short's former teammates from Jordan High School were in attendance as well as players from Chattahoochee Valley Community College.

"He was so humble, you never find too many people like Harry. He smiled. Even through the bad times he smiled," Jamar Pipkin said.

Harry's life was cut short after he was shot and killed at a Columbus night club by a security guard. Ms. Sims says that though Harry is gone his legacy will live on through the many lives he touched with his "all star" spirit.

"He was our all-star, he was Jordan's all-star, he was CVCC all star, but now he's God's all star."

Copyright 2013 WTVM. All rights reserved

  • Trending StoriesTrending StoriesMore>>

  • Parents make heartbreaking decision over son with autism

    Parents make heartbreaking decision over son with autism

    Wednesday, May 24 2017 11:10 AM EDT2017-05-24 15:10:16 GMT
    KMOV has chosen not to identify him by name or show pictures of what he currently looks like. (Credit: Wallens)KMOV has chosen not to identify him by name or show pictures of what he currently looks like. (Credit: Wallens)

    A parent's love knows no bounds. But what happens when you truly believe your child is going to harm himself or someone else? One family tells News 4 they made a heartbreaking decision about their son with autism, all because they felt they had no other options. 

    More >>

    A parent's love knows no bounds. But what happens when you truly believe your child is going to harm himself or someone else? One family tells News 4 they made a heartbreaking decision about their son with autism, all because they felt they had no other options. 

    More >>
  • Breaking

    Kirbyville High School principal resigns, then shoots, kills self in parking lot

    Kirbyville High School principal resigns, then shoots, kills self in parking lot

    Wednesday, May 24 2017 11:31 AM EDT2017-05-24 15:31:33 GMT

    Following his resignation Tuesday afternoon, the principal of Kirbyville High School walked out his truck, where he apparently shot and killed himself, according to police.

    More >>

    Following his resignation Tuesday afternoon, the principal of Kirbyville High School walked out his truck, where he apparently shot and killed himself, according to police.

    More >>
  • Deadly virus threatens local crawfish industry

    Deadly virus threatens local crawfish industry

    Tuesday, May 23 2017 7:26 PM EDT2017-05-23 23:26:19 GMT

    A deadly virus is threatening the crawfish industry in Southwest Louisiana. It's called white spot syndrome virus and it was first discovered in Thailand, but somehow it made its way to ponds in South Louisiana and specialists are struggling to find the funds to research a solution.  “The catch was increasing and increasing and then it dropped 70% and that's when you saw the dead crawfish floating in the water,” said a crawfish farmer of 34 years, Ian Garbarino. He...

    More >>

    A deadly virus is threatening the crawfish industry in Southwest Louisiana. It's called white spot syndrome virus and it was first discovered in Thailand, but somehow it made its way to ponds in South Louisiana and specialists are struggling to find the funds to research a solution.  “The catch was increasing and increasing and then it dropped 70% and that's when you saw the dead crawfish floating in the water,” said a crawfish farmer of 34 years, Ian Garbarino. He...

    More >>
Powered by Frankly