More car break-ins reported during football games - WTVM.com-Columbus, GA News Weather & Sports

More car break-ins reported during football games

Northview High School Northview High School
SYLVANIA, OH (Toledo News Now) -

Car break-ins at local schools are becoming an unwanted trend.

Recently, Perrysburg Police cautioned residents after cars were broken into at a Perrysburg school. Now, Sylvania Police are doing the same.

Police say car break-ins at Northview High School are a crime of opportunity. They say the problem is drivers are making it easy for thieves by leaving their cars unlocked, and leaving valuables in their car.

"If you don't need it, don't bring it," said Sylvania Police Captain Rick Schnoor. "If you do have it in your car, make sure it's secure."

He warns drivers to keep valuables out of sight, in the trunk of the car, or leave them at home.

The most recent break-ins were reported during last Friday's football game, where several people reported valuables stolen. Those included cell phones, an iPod, a camera valued at $850, medication, and a credit card. The thief made a fraudulent purchase of almost $500 on that card later.

"As we wind down towards the holidays, we sometimes see this, where property crimes, specifically car break-ins, do increase," Schnoor said. "So be aware of that."

An official at Sylvania Schools says the district was not aware of the break-ins.

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