Dance studio donates ballet costumes to Children's Hospital - WTVM.com-Columbus, GA News Weather & Sports

Dance studio donates ballet costumes to Children's Hospital

© (Courtesy Variation Studios) © (Courtesy Variation Studios)
AUBURN, AL (WSFA) -

A local dance studio in Auburn is making a special donation this Christmas.


Variations, a dance studio in Auburn, is donating over 300 new ballet costumes to Children's Hospital in Birmingham, Al.

"We love the fact that our studio is able to provide our young students with such a wonderful opportunity to learn the value of giving back to our community" said Stacy Young, Variations' Artistic Director.

The dancers personalized their contributions by writing get well notes to accompany the costumes. Students added a magical touch by signing the note cards as their character titles that they recently portrayed in their performance of the Nutcracker.  "We also are thrilled that the patients at Children's will receive their special costume from magical Nutcracker characters such as the Sugar Plum Fairy, Clara, Gingersnaps, and Guardian Angels," Young added.

"We are extremely excited to give these costumes to the sweet patients at Children's.  It is humbling to see our young dancers begin to understand the impact they are capable of making towards other children.  It is truly a beautiful process to be a orchestrate and witness," stated Young.

Variations will begin working on its next philanthropic performance, Choreography for a Cause, in the Spring of 2014 to benefit Storybook Farm, a local non-profit organization in Auburn, Alabama.

If you would like to donate to Children's Hospital or Storybook Farm, visit their websites for more information.

Source:Variations, a dance studio in Auburn 

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