Middle TN teen recovering from surgery for brain lesion - WTVM.com-Columbus, GA News Weather & Sports

Middle TN teen recovering from surgery for brain lesion

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NASHVILLE, TN (WSMV) -

A Middle Tennessee family is starting off the new year with new hope, as their son makes a remarkable recovery after a brain lesion was removed from his head.

Each day, 17-year-old Nathanael Price is making progress.

"I'm doing good," he said.

He is recovering from brain surgery after suffering from seizures since he was a child.

"You know if you get cold and your body shivers? Like that, just more aggressive," he said.

Price recalls that his left side would shut down almost as if he had a stroke.

Then, when he was 13, doctors finally diagnosed him with an Arteriovenous malformation, or an AVM. The condition causes tangles in both arteries and veins in the brain. Those vessels weaken over time, which can lead to significant bleeding.

"He played soccer, basketball and football and then his world had to come to a halt because those were no longer allowed," said mother Cindy Price.

Doctors tried several treatment options, including two rounds of radiation, but Nathanael Price wasn't getting better.

His family says many doctors thought that removing it was too risky.

"They are the most difficult lesions we treat as brain surgeons," said Dr. Robert Spetzler, Barrow Neurological Institute.

Spetzler is the Arizona surgeon who eventually removed the lesion on his brain. It was a complex treatment, given where the AVM was located.

Following the surgery, Nathanael Price had to undergo weeks of physical and speech therapy.

He's also still recovering from a bleed that happened after surgery.

"To be able to take that life and put it on a path of normal life expectancy, that is incredibly gratifying," Spetzler said.

Now, Nathanael Price is focused on his recovery and is making great progress. He's looking forward to once again spending time outdoors and future mission trips - something he's passionate about.

Later this year, doctors will check on Nathanael Price's progress by doing a MRI scan. They think he'll be in good shape and expect he'll make a great recovery with time.

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