Fallen firefighter's family makes generous move in wake of trage - WTVM.com-Columbus, GA News Weather & Sports

Fallen firefighter's family makes generous move in wake of tragedy

TOLEDO, OH (Toledo News Now) -

As two broken-hearted families prepare to say goodbye to their heroes in coming days, others are stepping up to make sure they have help getting by in the future.

The family of fallen Toledo firefighter Stephen Machcinski has decided to give all donations they receive on his behalf to the family of Private James Dickman. Both men died in a north Toledo fire Sunday.

Dickman leaves behind a wife, 3-year-old daughter and 1-month-old son. Machcinski is survived by his loving parents and a brother and sister.

Members of the Local 92 firefighters' union say it's no surprise that Machcinski's family would do such a thing, and it speaks volumes to the kind of firefighter and person he was.

"The firefighters that lost their lives, they lost their lives together," said Jeffrey Romstadt, from the Local 92. "Steve Machcinski and Jamie Dickman died together. That bond will always be there. It's part of the city's history, and those families will always have a bond, probably forever."

The Ohio Police and Fire Pension Fund says when a firefighter dies in the line of duty, their family receives their base salary until retirement.

Donations to the Toledo Fire and Rescue Foundation can be made at any Toledo Police or Toledo Fire Credit Union location. Dickman's family also set up a fund to assist his wife and children. Donations can be made to that at any PNC bank.

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Copyright 2014 Toledo News Now. All rights reserved.

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