Baby may help keep couples with fertility problems together - WTVM.com-Columbus, GA News Weather & Sports

Baby may help keep couples with fertility problems together

Updated: Jan 30, 2014 02:13 PM
© iStockphoto.com / Christine Tripp © iStockphoto.com / Christine Tripp
  • HEALTHMore>>

  • News 9 MD: New strides in leg lengthening technology

    News 9 MD: New strides in leg lengthening technology

    Friday, September 12 2014 6:13 AM EDT2014-09-12 10:13:07 GMT
    Imagine if one of your legs was longer than the other. It might not sound like a serious problem, but it could lead to severe hip or back pain if not treated. Now, there's a new way to permanently lengthenMore >>
    Imagine if one of your legs was longer than the other. It might not sound like a serious problem, but it could lead to severe hip or back pain if not treated. Now, there's a new way to permanently lengthenMore >>
  • News 9 MD: Heart surgery and transfusions

    News 9 MD: Heart surgery and transfusions

    Friday, September 5 2014 6:20 AM EDT2014-09-05 10:20:12 GMT
    One-fifth of the nation's entire blood supply used during heart surgery and blood transfusions is not only costly, but they can pose risks for patients. Some hospitals in the U.S. are significantly reduciMore >>
    Every two seconds in the United States, someone needs blood. One-fifth of the nation's entire blood supply used during heart surgery and blood transfusions is not only costly, but they can pose risks for patients. Some hospitals in the U.S. are significantly reducing transfusion rates during heart surgery.More >>
  • News 9 MD: Ear cancer survivor gets new "ear"

    News 9 MD: Ear cancer survivor gets new "ear"

    Friday, August 29 2014 6:38 AM EDT2014-08-29 10:38:07 GMT
    Whether he's playing hockey or flying high, Henry Fiorentini lives an active lifestyle. But a few years ago, a very common form of skin cancer called basal cell carcinoma almost took his life. "It'sMore >>
    Whether he's playing hockey or flying high, Henry Fiorentini lives an active lifestyle. But a few years ago, a very common form of skin cancer called basal cell carcinoma almost took his life. "It'sMore >>

THURSDAY, Jan. 30, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Couples who seek evaluation for infertility problems are more likely to stay together if they are ultimately able to have a child, a new Danish study suggests.

Researchers followed couples after they first sought assistance with fertility issues. Women who didn't have a child over the next 12 years were up to three times more likely to get divorced or end the relationship compared to women who gave birth to a child during that follow-up period, the investigators found.

The study included more than 47,500 women in Denmark who were evaluated for infertility between 1990 and 2006. Among this group, 57 percent gave birth after fertility treatment.

The findings are published in the Jan. 29 online edition of the journal Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, a journal of the Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

"Our findings suggest that not having a child after fertility treatment may adversely affect the duration of a relationship for couples with fertility issues," said study lead author Trille Kristina Kjaer, of the survivorship unit at the Danish Cancer Society Research Center in Copenhagen.

"Further investigations that account for marital quality and relational well-being of couples with fertility problems are now needed," Kjaer noted in a journal news release.

Previous research has examined the effects of infertility and suggested that women may be more deeply affected. Failing to have a baby despite efforts can lead to high levels of stress and anxiety for the couple and may negatively affect their quality of life, the study authors noted in the news release.

However, the researchers added, other studies have suggested that a fertility struggle can also bring a couple closer together, creating what is sometimes called a "marital benefit" brought on by sharing a common hardship.

While the study found an association between failed fertility treatment efforts and breakups among couples, it did not prove a cause-and-effect relationship.

More information

For more about infertility, visit the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

Copyright © 2014 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

*DISCLAIMER*: The information contained in or provided through this site section is intended for general consumer understanding and education only and is not intended to be and is not a substitute for professional advice. Use of this site section and any information contained on or provided through this site section is at your own risk and any information contained on or provided through this site section is provided on an "as is" basis without any representations or warranties.
Powered by WorldNow

1909 Wynnton Road
Columbus, Ga. 31906

FCC Public File
publicfile@wtvm.com
706-494-5400
EEO Report
Closed Captioning

All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Worldnow and WTVM. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.