Suspect in murder of man found at Alcoa in Warrick Co. Jail - WTVM.com-Columbus, GA News Weather & Sports

Suspect in murder of man found at Alcoa in Warrick Co. Jail

Mathew McCallister (Source: Warrick County Sheriff's Office) Mathew McCallister (Source: Warrick County Sheriff's Office)
David Lackey Jr. (Source: Warrick County Jail) David Lackey Jr. (Source: Warrick County Jail)
Jade Stigall (Source: Warrick County Jail) Jade Stigall (Source: Warrick County Jail)
Shawn Grigsby (Source: Warrick County Jail) Shawn Grigsby (Source: Warrick County Jail)
WARRICK CO., IN (WFIE) -

The man suspected of shooting and killing Joseph Nelson is now in the Warrick County Jail.  

Mathew McCallister was transferred from Marion County on Tuesday afternoon. Officials say McCallister has an initial hearing Wednesday morning.

Court documents identified McCallister as the person who shot and killed Nelson on the morning on February 17. Nelson's body was found on a conveyor belt at Alcoa's power plant. Officials say he died from a gunshot wound to the head.

Two of the other suspects, David Lackey Jr. and Jade Stigall are due in court next week on a motion to release. The third suspect, Shawn Grigsby, will appear in July.

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