Blessing for Bikers gives back to community - WTVM.com-Columbus, GA News Weather & Sports

Blessing for Bikers gives back to community

COLUMBUS, GA (WTVM) -

More than 100 bikers are getting on their motorcycles to give back to the community while also receiving the word of God.

The Tru Ryderz Club hosted their fifth annual Bike Blessing on Saturday March 22.

Secretary of the club Casandra Hill started the event to motivate the bikers to start driving safe and to have a day where local bikers could come together and ride.

"It's very powerful because one, your bike is getting blessed," Hill said. "Once the Christian association blesses our bikes they give us a sticker we put on our bike and it puts that shield over you. It helps me and that's what most people say so this is an exciting event for our bikers."

This is the first year the bike blessing event has taken place at the National Infantry Museum.

Money collected from t-shirt sales will go back to the community to help low-income families.

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