New procedure could shine a light on endometriosis diagnoses - WTVM.com-Columbus, GA News Weather & Sports

New procedure could shine a light on endometriosis diagnoses

(Source: Ivanhoe Newswire) (Source: Ivanhoe Newswire)

BALTIMORE (Ivanhoe Newswire/WTVM) - More than 6 million American women and girls struggle with endometriosis, a chronic condition that causes pain before and after their menstrual cycle.

It can also cause infertility and in some cases, endometriosis is difficult to diagnose, but a new imaging method may shed light on difficult to detect cases.

Susie Veech, 28, has spent more than half her life trying to figure out the source of the monthly, searing pain in her side.

“Eleven, on a scale of one to 10, the pain," Veech said. 

Veech had endometriosis. The tissue normally lining the inside of her uterus was also growing on the outside and blocking other organs.

Gynecologist and co-director of the Endometriosis Center and the Minimally Invasive Surgical fellowship program at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore, Kevin Audlin, MD, is studying a new imaging technique designed to help gynecologists detect endometriosis. Traditionally, doctors use a minimally-invasive tool called a laparoscope to look for tissue.

“Full spectrum light looks just as if we would see. If you’re looking into a belly, you’ll see organs, most everything is either a yellowish or a pink,” Dr. Audlin explains.

In addition, Dr. Audlin is testing special lighting called narrow band imaging. When he presses a button on the laparoscope, the light changes, making endometriosis stand out.

Dr. Audlin says, “The red hue tends to be the endometriosis, the green we see tends to be the actual vasculature.”

For Veech, finally a diagnosis followed by a procedure to keep the endometriosis at bay. She says, “When everyday pain goes away, you have tons of energy. You don’t realize how much it’s weighing you down.”

In a study of 150 women undergoing the laparoscopic procedure for endometriosis, researchers found the addition of narrow band imaging improved detection by 20 percent. Dr. Audlin says the narrow band imaging offers another avenue for women who have had chronic pain but are not showing signs of endometriosis with traditional screening.

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