Adderall abuse on the rise - WTVM.com-Columbus, GA News Weather & Sports

Adderall abuse on the rise

COLUMBUS, GA (WTVM) -

Troubling new research released this week from Johns Hopkins University shows Adderall abuse is on the rise across the country, with an increase in teens and young adults.

Health professionals at Bradford Health Services in Columbus are not surprised at all by this new research, saying Adderall and other prescription drug abuse is an issue they deal with all the time, right here in the Valley.

"We get dozens of calls for teens per month," said Rebecca Watkins with the treatment center.

While the issue isn't new, it's now on the rise, worrying health professionals.

"There are a lot of over the counter medications that we see, there are a lot of prescription pills that we see, including Adderall, including Xanax," said Watkins.

New research from Johns Hopkins suggests that young adults between 18 and 25 are the leading demographic of Adderall abuse, a drug commonly prescribed for attention deficit disorders.

The study released Tuesday also shows that misuse and emergency room visits related to the drug are up, while legitimate prescriptions for the medicine are not.

Experts with Bradford Health Services say the pressures of school and adolescent life may be what's prompting the rise.

"I'll go around to different high schools in the area and we talk to students, and I say why do people like to use drugs? and they all yell out stress, the first thing they say is stress," said Watkins.

New research has also found that teens and young adults are mostly getting the pills from family or friends.

"Lock up your medicine cabinets, just check in with how many pills you have and how many you have at the end of that week, that's a big deal," said Watkins.

Health experts say the drug could have serious consequences when used improperly, effecting your sleep, heart and could also lead to mental health problems or drug addiction later in life.

Experts also add that parents should look for signs of drug abuse in their children such as an unusual need to access money, unusual sleeping patterns, lying, and changes in their peer group. 

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