WATCH: NASA's coverage of Tuesday's solar eclipse - WTVM.com-Columbus, GA News Weather & Sports

WATCH: NASA's coverage of Tuesday's solar eclipse

NASA explains that a solar eclipse happens when the moon moves between the sun and Earth. (Source: NASA.gov) NASA explains that a solar eclipse happens when the moon moves between the sun and Earth. (Source: NASA.gov)

(WTVM) – Want to watch something amazing? Mother Nature will have some folks looking up to the skies Tuesday evening for a solar eclipse.

NASA explains that this happens when the moon moves between the sun and Earth. When this happens, the moon blocks the light of the sun from reaching Earth, causing an eclipse of the sun, also known as a solar eclipse.

During a solar eclipse, the moon casts a shadow onto Earth. There are three types of solar eclipses: total, partial, and annular.

A total solar eclipse will be visible to people in Southeast Asia, while people in parts of Alaska, Hawaii, Guam and American Samoa will see a partial solar eclipse.

Solar eclipses happen once every 18 months, and they only last a few minutes, unlike a lunar eclipse.

Never look directly at the sun because it can permanently damage your eyes. If you are lucky enough to see it in person, make sure to use the proper safety equipment.

You can watch NASA’s livestream of the solar total eclipse, which is predicted to happen from 8:38 p.m. to 8:42 p.m. ET Tuesday night.

Aug. 21 is when the next solar eclipse will be visible in the U.S.

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