What you need to know to stay safe in summertime heat - WTVM.com-Columbus, GA News Weather & Sports

What you need to know to stay safe in summertime heat

Heat is one of the leading weather-related killers in the United States, resulting in hundreds of fatalities each year. (Source: WTVM) Heat is one of the leading weather-related killers in the United States, resulting in hundreds of fatalities each year. (Source: WTVM)
A heat wave is a prolonged period of excessive heat, generally, 10 degrees or more above average, often combined with excessive humidity. (Source: Weather.gov) A heat wave is a prolonged period of excessive heat, generally, 10 degrees or more above average, often combined with excessive humidity. (Source: Weather.gov)

(WTVM) – With summertime here, extremely dangerous heat is upon us. 

You need to be careful whenever you are outside for an extended period of time and even make sure you are cool indoors, too.

Heat is one of the leading weather-related killers in the United States, resulting in hundreds of fatalities each year and even more heat-related illnesses.

There is a range of heat illnesses and they can affect anyone, regardless of age or physical condition.

OSHA has a simple message when it comes to being outdoors: Water. Rest. Shade. When being outside for extended periods of time, stay hydrated, take frequent breaks, rest in the shade, and wear a hat along with protective and comfortable clothing.

In recent years, excessive heat has caused more deaths than all other weather events, including floods. A heat wave is a prolonged period of excessive heat, generally, 10 degrees or more above average, often combined with excessive humidity.

According to the National Weather Service, you will likely hear meteorologists use these terms when a heat wave is predicted in your community:

  • Excessive Heat Watch: Conditions are favorable for an excessive heat event to meet or exceed local Excessive Heat Warning criteria in the next 24 to 72 hours.
  • Heat Advisory: Heat Index values are forecasting to meet locally defined advisory criteria for 1 to 2 days (daytime highs = 100-105° Fahrenheit).
  • Excessive Heat Warning: Heat Index values are forecasting to meet or exceed locally defined warning criteria for at least 2 days (daytime highs = 105-110° Fahrenheit).

Click here for a list of things to keep in mind before a heat wave hits, which include checking on the elderly, young, or sick to make sure they have a way to stay cool.

Click here for a list of things to keep in mind during a heat wave, which includes avoiding strenuous exercise or outdoor activity during the heat of the day.

Three most common heat-related illnesses are heat cramps, heat exhaustion, and heat stroke. Click here to learn more about all three and how to recognize and respond to them before it’s too late.

Heat-related deaths are preventable. Protect yourself and others from the impacts of the heat.

The following is a heat-safety checklist from the American Red Cross so you can make sure you and your family are safe:

Copyright 2017 WTVM. All rights reserved. | For more news, download the WTVM app here

  • Inside News Leader 9More>>

  • Special

    As seen on 9

    As seen on 9

    Saw a story on-air and want to learn more? Find the social media talkers and big news stories here.

    More >>

    Saw a story on-air and want to learn more? Find the social media talkers and big news stories here.

    More >>
Powered by Frankly