Tularemia in patients - WTVM.com-Columbus, GA News Weather & Sports

Tularemia in patients

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  • Preventing spinal cord injuries in athletes

    Preventing spinal cord injuries in athletes

    Tuesday, October 4 2016 6:26 PM EDT2016-10-04 22:26:33 GMT
    (Source: WTVM)(Source: WTVM)

    Spinal cord injuries are not considered common on the football field, but they can be dramatic.  In some cases, those injuries can lead to paralysis.  

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    Spinal cord injuries are not considered common on the football field, but they can be dramatic.  In some cases, those injuries can lead to paralysis.  

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  • Columbus doctor addresses concussions in sports

    Columbus doctor addresses concussions in sports

    Tuesday, August 30 2016 6:13 PM EDT2016-08-30 22:13:50 GMT
    (Source: WTVM)(Source: WTVM)

    A lot has changed recently in the world of sports to help prevent concussions among athletes. New rules are now in place for football and soccer players at the high school, collegiate and professional levels.  

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    A lot has changed recently in the world of sports to help prevent concussions among athletes. New rules are now in place for football and soccer players at the high school, collegiate and professional levels.  

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  • How to protect yourself from the flu virus

    How to protect yourself from the flu virus

    Thursday, January 12 2017 7:03 PM EST2017-01-13 00:03:44 GMT
    (Source: WTVM)(Source: WTVM)

    Georgia has seen its first flu-related death this year, and 108 people have been hospitalized so far this season in our area due to the flu. The health department says the individual who died from the flu was elderly, but it can strike anyone at any time. 

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    Georgia has seen its first flu-related death this year, and 108 people have been hospitalized so far this season in our area due to the flu. The health department says the individual who died from the flu was elderly, but it can strike anyone at any time. 

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Federal health officials are renewing warnings about a rare bacterial illness that people can contract from animal carcasses. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention urges doctors to watch for tularemia in patients who were around ticks or dead animals. CDC says eleven people in Oklahoma were sickened, two fatally, in an out outbreak last summer. The disease , commonly called rabbit fever, strikes suddently, usually bringing high fever, chills, fatigue and headache. About 100 cases are reported every year in the United States. Usually less than two percent are deadly.

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