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Eye fingerprint

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  • Preventing spinal cord injuries in athletes

    Preventing spinal cord injuries in athletes

    Tuesday, October 4 2016 6:26 PM EDT2016-10-04 22:26:33 GMT
    (Source: WTVM)(Source: WTVM)

    Spinal cord injuries are not considered common on the football field, but they can be dramatic.  In some cases, those injuries can lead to paralysis.  

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    Spinal cord injuries are not considered common on the football field, but they can be dramatic.  In some cases, those injuries can lead to paralysis.  

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  • Columbus doctor addresses concussions in sports

    Columbus doctor addresses concussions in sports

    Tuesday, August 30 2016 6:13 PM EDT2016-08-30 22:13:50 GMT
    (Source: WTVM)(Source: WTVM)

    A lot has changed recently in the world of sports to help prevent concussions among athletes. New rules are now in place for football and soccer players at the high school, collegiate and professional levels.  

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    A lot has changed recently in the world of sports to help prevent concussions among athletes. New rules are now in place for football and soccer players at the high school, collegiate and professional levels.  

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  • How to protect yourself from the flu virus

    How to protect yourself from the flu virus

    Thursday, January 12 2017 7:03 PM EST2017-01-13 00:03:44 GMT
    (Source: WTVM)(Source: WTVM)

    Georgia has seen its first flu-related death this year, and 108 people have been hospitalized so far this season in our area due to the flu. The health department says the individual who died from the flu was elderly, but it can strike anyone at any time. 

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    Georgia has seen its first flu-related death this year, and 108 people have been hospitalized so far this season in our area due to the flu. The health department says the individual who died from the flu was elderly, but it can strike anyone at any time. 

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Deanna Foster's astigmatism causes her to squint a lot. "I can't wait to see if I can wake up in the night and actually see, or go swimming and not run into the wall," said Deanna. At Baylor College of Medicine they're making a fingerprint of Deanna's eye. It's like a map of her eye problems or aberrations. The information from the fingerprint of the eye is programmed directly into a laser, correcting aberrations that most people never even realize they have. At this point it's all done automatically. The surgeon has no manual control. "There are levels of vision that are possible with the human eye that we haven't reached yet and the goal of this surgery done in this way is to enable us to get there," said Dr. Douglas Koch, a principal investigator. Deanna is in a study at Baylor College of Medicine. The personalized fingerprint of the eye makes the laser more accurate, giving you a more precise correction, including better sharpness, even better color. Theoretically, it could give people 20/10 vision by correcting all their vision aberrations simultaneously. After the fingerprint, a preview lens is made, giving the patient a chance to test the correction before surgery. Deanna's laser surgery on both eyes took less than 20 minutes. Dr. Koch can correct nearsightedness and astigmatism simulataneously. Five minutes after surgery, Deanna tested at 20/30. "Already good enough to drive without glasses. Oh awesome", said Deanna. The next day Deanna's vision was 20/20.     

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