Littering In Columbus Could Cost You - WTVM.com-Columbus, GA News Weather & Sports

Littering In Columbus Could Cost You

Throwing out a cigarette butt or a piece of trash while driving could cost you a hefty fine. Columbus city leaders and police are cracking down on littering, as part of a statewide campaign.

Look on the side of any highway in Columbus, and you'll see paper, bottles, and other trash scattered throughout.

Now that fifty cent can of soda could cost you hundreds or thousands, if police catch you throwing it out.

We'll be more vigilant and of course, we'll be in zero tolerance mode as far as littering is concerned," said Major Julius Graham, from Columbus Police Dept.

Columbus officials met with community leaders to get the word out about a statewide anti-litter campaign.

The slogan: littering, it costs you. Leaders say a little trash can really cost homeowners.

"It's been proven with different studies that a neighborhood with litter starts to lose property value, pride in the community goes down," said Bill Green, from Keep Columbus Beautiful.

The Georgia Department of Transportation spends 14-million dollars a year picking up trash that flies out of the back of trucks.

So even if you don't mean to litter, you can still pay for it.

"It's against the law to have an unsecured load on trucks, and from time to time we do get complaints and especially on our major thoroughfares of debris flying from the back of trucks," said Maj. Graham.

"People start to look at it as a blighted area, and pretty soon nobody wants to live there. So we don't want that to happen to Columbus," said Green.

If you see any large debris or trash on the road, city leaders want you to call 311, which is the citizen service center. And they'll send someone out to pick up the litter.

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