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  • Preventing spinal cord injuries in athletes

    Preventing spinal cord injuries in athletes

    Tuesday, October 4 2016 6:26 PM EDT2016-10-04 22:26:33 GMT
    (Source: WTVM)(Source: WTVM)

    Spinal cord injuries are not considered common on the football field, but they can be dramatic.  In some cases, those injuries can lead to paralysis.  

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    Spinal cord injuries are not considered common on the football field, but they can be dramatic.  In some cases, those injuries can lead to paralysis.  

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  • Columbus doctor addresses concussions in sports

    Columbus doctor addresses concussions in sports

    Tuesday, August 30 2016 6:13 PM EDT2016-08-30 22:13:50 GMT
    (Source: WTVM)(Source: WTVM)

    A lot has changed recently in the world of sports to help prevent concussions among athletes. New rules are now in place for football and soccer players at the high school, collegiate and professional levels.  

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    A lot has changed recently in the world of sports to help prevent concussions among athletes. New rules are now in place for football and soccer players at the high school, collegiate and professional levels.  

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  • How to protect yourself from the flu virus

    How to protect yourself from the flu virus

    Thursday, January 12 2017 7:03 PM EST2017-01-13 00:03:44 GMT
    (Source: WTVM)(Source: WTVM)

    Georgia has seen its first flu-related death this year, and 108 people have been hospitalized so far this season in our area due to the flu. The health department says the individual who died from the flu was elderly, but it can strike anyone at any time. 

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    Georgia has seen its first flu-related death this year, and 108 people have been hospitalized so far this season in our area due to the flu. The health department says the individual who died from the flu was elderly, but it can strike anyone at any time. 

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  American scientists have turned rats into "intelligent robots" by implanting electrodes in their brains. The remote-controlled rodents can be instructed to turn left or right, climb trees and navigate piles or rubble. Someday reserchers hope rats carrying tiny video cameras will be able to search for humans trapped under buildings in earthquakes and other disasters. The research was carried out by Sanjiv Talwar, a professor of physiology and pharmacology at the State University of New York in Brooklyn. "You essentially control the animal from afar. And that is a concern. If you're talking about larger animals they can carry larger payloads. And you can virtually strap anything else," said Talwar. Some scientists are concerned the technology could get into the hands of criminals or terrorists. The concept could be used to control humans. When given a signal by a laptop computer, the electrodes stimulated the rodents' brains and cued them to scurry in the desired direction. It then rewarded them by stimulating a pleasure centre in the brain.

 

 

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