Common Future - WTVM.com-Columbus, GA News Weather & Sports

Common Future

  Many would say Fort Gaines is a blast form the past. "If you're interested in the big city life, don't come here. We're a laid back friendly town," said  Economic Development Council  member Claude Cook  Fort Gaines is known for its visual qualities. From seeing the Chattahoochee River in its most original state, to its Frontier Village that will take you back to the way of life in the 1800's. "As time went on, several buildings were going to be demolished. We salvaged them for our kids so they can see the older times of the areas," said Cook. In the past, the townspeople tried to get industries to locate here. When that wasn't happening, the economic development team began to promote their assets. They're saying there are so many recreational activities, it makes a great place for retirement. Just down the road a piece is the George Bagley State Park. The convention center has had to turn away large groups because there isn't enough room. Now a three million dollar project will change that. The lodge is doubling its rooms, building a new restaurant and adding more conference space. With the park located on Lake Walter F. George and its 18 hole championship golf course nearby, community leaders are looking for an economic boost. "Help the park by raising revenue with more people coming in. And they'll also be spending money around town, with the sales tax", said Charles Powell of George Bagley State Park. Construction should be finished by January of next year.

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  • Deadly virus threatens local crawfish industry

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    Tuesday, May 23 2017 7:26 PM EDT2017-05-23 23:26:19 GMT

    A deadly virus is threatening the crawfish industry in Southwest Louisiana. It's called white spot syndrome virus and it was first discovered in Thailand, but somehow it made its way to ponds in South Louisiana and specialists are struggling to find the funds to research a solution.  “The catch was increasing and increasing and then it dropped 70% and that's when you saw the dead crawfish floating in the water,” said a crawfish farmer of 34 years, Ian Garbarino. He...

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    A deadly virus is threatening the crawfish industry in Southwest Louisiana. It's called white spot syndrome virus and it was first discovered in Thailand, but somehow it made its way to ponds in South Louisiana and specialists are struggling to find the funds to research a solution.  “The catch was increasing and increasing and then it dropped 70% and that's when you saw the dead crawfish floating in the water,” said a crawfish farmer of 34 years, Ian Garbarino. He...

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