Auburn University reentry testing results show 4 percent positivity rate

Auburn University reentry testing results show 4 percent positivity rate
A total of 21,315 tests were given in the weeks leading up to the fall semester, and there were 859 positive results.

AUBURN, Ala. (WSFA) - Auburn University’s reentry testing results show there was a 4 percent positivity rate among students returning for classes this fall, the university announced Thursday.

A total of 21,315 tests were given in the weeks leading up to the fall semester, and there were 859 positive results. This data includes tests up until Aug. 21.

The university said the majority of those who tested positive were asymptomatic or exhibited “extremely mild conditions.” Many of the positive cases were students who weren’t on campus. The ones who were on campus were quarantined and isolated.

Auburn University required the tests for students returning to campus this fall. They were offered for free through the state’s GuideSafe program.

The university said the reentry testing data gives a good snapshot of the student population leading up to this semester, but it doesn’t reflect the current conditions.

For the week of Aug. 15-21, the university received 207 new reports of COVID-19 cases not affiliated with the GuideSafe reentry testing. Of those new reports, five were employees and 202 were students.

Auburn’s COVID-19 Health and Exposure webpage, which is updated weekly, offers the most current COVID-19 data as it is reported through the Auburn University Medical Clinic and self-reports.

Tracking of additional COVID-19 cases will continue as they come in through the Auburn University Medical Clinic, the Alabama Department of Public Health and those in the campus community who fill out the university’s online self-report form.

Bobby Woodard, senior vice president for Student Affairs, called on students to do their part to keep the numbers down.

“COVID is truly a situation in which every individual’s actions count,” Woodard said. “If we are going to preserve on-campus education, we have to be all-in, both on and off campus. One night out in a crowd is not worth the potential consequences the entire campus will face if the virus continues to spread in our community. We must be vigilant in doing our part for the common good. This will not be forever.”

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