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Fully vaccinated Columbus resident weighs in on vaccination process

Updated: Mar. 22, 2021 at 11:09 PM EDT
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COLUMBUS, Ga. (WTVM) - Thousands of people in Georgia have already gotten their COVID-19 vaccines while others wait in anticipation for the chance to get theirs.

Some people are hesitant because of rumors suggesting that the vaccines are not safe.

Columbus resident Sharon Hightower is aware of some concerns people have over the safety of the vaccines. She said now that it has been a full two weeks since receiving her second shot, she never experienced any complications.

“It is such a relief. I feel like I can conquer the world now. I love it!” Hightower said.

The thought to not be vaccinated never crossed Hightower’s mind, despite being skeptical over how fast the vaccines were developed.

“I did not have the first bit of reaction, not on the first shot and not on the second one.” she said.

Health officials say side effects can vary from person to person, depending on factors like age and their immune system.

“The most common side effects are pain in your arm around the injection site, redness and swelling,” said Pamela Kirkland with the Columbus Health Department said. “We have not gotten any reports that anyone has died from the vaccine.”

Between social media and input from people, at least three other people who did not want to be on camera say they are hesitant to take the vaccine, including Hightower’s son.

“I said that will keep you out of the hospital and will keep you from dying, but he told me it is too soon mom, we don’t know anything about it yet,” she said.

Hightower says even though she is fully vaccinated, she still takes caution and wears a mask everywhere.

She now has 95 percent protection against coronavirus and can get back to doing things that she loves, like playing a game of bridge with her other friends who are also fully vaccinated.

“It is just a freedom feeling that now I can do so much that I could not do before,” Hightower said.

Another common myth is getting the vaccine can give you the virus. Kirkland said this is false. The vaccine is what they call Messenger RNA and does not contain a live or dead strain of the coronavirus.

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