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Breakthrough COVID cases a possibility with vaccine

According to Dr. Frederick Kam with Auburn University, you can still contract the coronavirus if you’ve been vaccinated against it, but you stand a better chance of not going to the hospital or dying if you do.
Published: Jul. 29, 2021 at 6:58 PM EDT
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COLUMBUS, Ga. (WTVM) - One east Alabama doctor told News Leader 9, it’s better for people to have had the COVID-19 vaccine, rather than to not have it, and need it. According to Dr. Frederick Kam with Auburn University, you can still contract the coronavirus if you’ve been vaccinated against it, but you stand a better chance of not going to the hospital or dying if you do. He told News Leader 9, it’s something that’s not uncommon.

“So a breakthrough case is when someone has been fully vaccinated gets infected. The vaccine won’t prevent you from getting infected, it will prevent you from getting severely sick, hospitalized, or dying from COVD.”, said Dr. Kam. “No vaccine prevents infection 100%. Take for example a vaccine that a lot of people get every year. The flu vaccine. Some years the flu vaccine on some of it’s best years it works 60% of preventing someone from getting the flu, but the reason we do get the flu vaccine is to prevent people from getting severely sick. Nobody’s really focusing on the longer term after effects of getting infected with COVID and what we can tell is the vaccine significantly preventing that also.”

According to data from the CDC, of the 57% of Americans who have had at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine, less than 1% have had a breakthrough COVID case.

Willie Murray, an Auburn man said, “It’s like having insurance on your automobile. If you have it and happen to need it then you’re good, but if you don’t have it and happen to need it, then you’re in trouble.”

However, Lauren Hamby, an Auburn woman, told News Leader 9 she’s hesitant about being inoculated against COVID-19.

Hamby said, “I think it was very rushed and you never know the long term side effects. I just don’t think that it’s a good idea to get a vaccination that hasn’t been around for five years.”

Doctor Kam adds, people should be concerned about the long term side effects of contracting the virus, like brain fog, shortness of breath, a persistent cough, or organ failure opposed to being hesitant about taking the vaccine. Dr. Kam told News Leader 9, with the delta variant circulating, it’s better for people to get vaccinated sooner than later, especially heading into the fall months.

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